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Evidence for pleiotropism and recent selection in the PLAG1 region in Australian Beef cattle

Overview of attention for article published in Animal Genetics, August 2013
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Title
Evidence for pleiotropism and recent selection in the PLAG1 region in Australian Beef cattle
Published in
Animal Genetics, August 2013
DOI 10.1111/age.12075
Pubmed ID
Authors

M. R. S. Fortes, K. Kemper, S. Sasazaki, A. Reverter, J. E. Pryce, W. Barendse, R. Bunch, R. McCulloch, B. Harrison, S. Bolormaa, Y. D. Zhang, R. J. Hawken, M. E. Goddard, S. A. Lehnert

Abstract

A putative functional mutation (rs109231213) near PLAG1 (BTA14) associated with stature was studied in beef cattle. Data from 8199 Bos taurus, Bos indicus and Tropical Composite cattle were used to test the associations between rs109231213 and various phenotypes. Further, 23 496 SNPs located on BTA14 were tested for association with these phenotypes, both independently and fitted together with rs109231213. The C allele of rs109231213 significantly increased hip height, weight, net food intake, age at puberty in males and females and decreased IGF-I concentration in blood and fat depth. When rs109231213 was fitted as a fixed effect in the model, there was an overall reduction in associations between other SNPs and these traits but some SNPs remained associated (P < 10(-4) ). Frequency of the mutant C allele of rs109231213 differed among B. indicus (0.52), B. taurus (0.96) and Tropical Composite (0.68). Most chromosomes carrying the C allele had the same surrounding 10 SNP haplotype, probably because the C allele was introgressed into Brahman from B. taurus cattle. A region of reduced heterozygosity surrounds the C allele; this is small in B. taurus but 20 Mb long in Brahmans, indicating recent and strong selection for the mutant allele. Thus, the C allele appears to mark a mutation that has been selected almost to fixation in the B. taurus breeds studied here and introduced into Brahman cattle during grading up and selected to a frequency of 0.52 despite its negative effects on fertility.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Colombia 2 5%
United States 1 3%
Uganda 1 3%
Unknown 34 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 37%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 13%
Researcher 5 13%
Student > Master 4 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 8%
Other 7 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 25 66%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 16%
Unspecified 4 11%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 5%
Computer Science 1 3%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 August 2013.
All research outputs
#9,864,355
of 12,354,561 outputs
Outputs from Animal Genetics
#612
of 861 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#103,608
of 152,342 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Animal Genetics
#15
of 28 outputs
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