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Population structure and genetic diversity of the giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla: Myrmecophagidae, Pilosa) in Brazil

Overview of attention for article published in Genetics and Molecular Biology, February 2017
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3 Facebook pages

Citations

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Title
Population structure and genetic diversity of the giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla: Myrmecophagidae, Pilosa) in Brazil
Published in
Genetics and Molecular Biology, February 2017
DOI 10.1590/1678-4685-gmb-2016-0104
Pubmed ID
Authors

Camila L. Clozato, Flávia R. Miranda, Paula Lara-Ruiz, Rosane G. Collevatti, Fabrício R. Santos

Abstract

The giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla, Pilosa, Linnaeus 1758) belongs to the mammalian order Pilosa and presents a large distribution along South America, occupying a great variety of habitats. It is listed in the IUCN Red List of threatened species as Vulnerable. Despite threatened, there is a lack of studies regarding its genetic variability. The aim of this study was to examine the genetic diversity and patterns of genetic structure within remaining populations. We analyzed 77 individuals from seven different populations distributed in four biomes across Brazil: Cerrado, Pantanal, Atlantic Forest and Amazon Forest. We sequenced two mitochondrial markers (control region and Cyt-b) and two nuclear markers (AMELY and RAG2). We found high genetic diversity within subpopulations from National Parks of Serra da Canastra and Emas, both within the Cerrado biome, with signs of population expansion. Besides, we found a notable population structure between populations from the Cerrado/Pantanal and Amazon Forest biomes. This data is a major contribution to the knowledge of the evolutionary history of the species and to future management actions concerning its conservation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 60 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Unknown 59 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 22%
Student > Bachelor 10 17%
Researcher 7 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 8%
Student > Postgraduate 4 7%
Other 7 12%
Unknown 14 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 26 43%
Environmental Science 7 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 7%
Business, Management and Accounting 3 5%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 2%
Other 3 5%
Unknown 16 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 September 2019.
All research outputs
#13,916,168
of 21,448,133 outputs
Outputs from Genetics and Molecular Biology
#265
of 265 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#162,954
of 277,637 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genetics and Molecular Biology
#6
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,448,133 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 265 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,637 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.