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Polygamy slows down population divergence in shorebirds

Overview of attention for article published in Evolution, April 2017
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#7 of 3,480)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
20 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
twitter
104 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

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74 Mendeley
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Title
Polygamy slows down population divergence in shorebirds
Published in
Evolution, April 2017
DOI 10.1111/evo.13212
Pubmed ID
Authors

Josephine D'Urban Jackson, Natalie dos Remedios, Kathryn H. Maher, Sama Zefania, Susan Haig, Sara Oyler-McCance, Donald Blomqvist, Terry Burke, Michael W. Bruford, Tamás Székely, Clemens Küpper

Abstract

Sexual selection may act as a promotor of speciation since divergent mate choice and competition for mates can rapidly lead to reproductive isolation. Alternatively, sexual selection may also retard speciation since polygamous individuals can access additional mates by increased breeding dispersal. High breeding dispersal should hence increase gene flow and reduce diversification in polygamous species. Here we test how polygamy predicts diversification in shorebirds using genetic differentiation and subspecies richness as proxies for population divergence. Examining microsatellite data from 79 populations in ten plover species (Genus: Charadrius) we found that polygamous species display significantly less genetic structure and weaker isolation-by-distance effects than monogamous species. Consistent with this result, a comparative analysis including 136 shorebird species showed significantly fewer subspecies for polygamous than for monogamous species. By contrast, migratory behaviour neither predicted genetic differentiation nor subspecies richness. Taken together, our results suggest that dispersal associated with polygamy may facilitate gene flow and limit population divergence. Therefore, intense sexual selection, as occurs in polygamous species, may act as a brake rather than an engine of speciation in shorebirds. We discuss alternative explanations for these results and call for further studies to understand the relationships between sexual selection, dispersal and diversification. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 104 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 74 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 2 3%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Switzerland 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Czechia 1 1%
Netherlands 1 1%
Unknown 67 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 22%
Researcher 12 16%
Student > Bachelor 10 14%
Unspecified 7 9%
Other 12 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 50 68%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 14%
Unspecified 9 12%
Environmental Science 5 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 250. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 September 2018.
All research outputs
#47,712
of 13,218,801 outputs
Outputs from Evolution
#7
of 3,480 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,449
of 257,909 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Evolution
#1
of 66 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,218,801 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,480 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 257,909 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 66 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.