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Systems thinking in practice: the current status of the six WHO building blocks for health system strengthening in three BHOMA intervention districts of Zambia: a baseline qualitative study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, August 2013
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
26 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
232 Mendeley
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Title
Systems thinking in practice: the current status of the six WHO building blocks for health system strengthening in three BHOMA intervention districts of Zambia: a baseline qualitative study
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, August 2013
DOI 10.1186/1472-6963-13-291
Pubmed ID
Authors

Wilbroad Mutale, Virginia Bond, Margaret Tembo Mwanamwenge, Susan Mlewa, Dina Balabanova, Neil Spicer, Helen Ayles

Abstract

The primary bottleneck to achieving the MDGs in low-income countries is health systems that are too fragile to deliver the volume and quality of services to those in need. Strong and effective health systems are increasingly considered a prerequisite to reducing the disease burden and to achieving the health MDGs. Zambia is one of the countries that are lagging behind in achieving millennium development targets. Several barriers have been identified as hindering the progress towards health related millennium development goals. Designing an intervention that addresses these barriers was crucial and so the Better Health Outcomes through Mentorship (BHOMA) project was designed to address the challenges in the Zambia's MOH using a system wide approach. We applied systems thinking approach to describe the baseline status of the Six WHO building blocks for health system strengthening.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 232 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 4 2%
United States 3 1%
Kenya 2 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Ghana 1 <1%
Guatemala 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Indonesia 1 <1%
Unknown 218 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 68 29%
Researcher 47 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 10%
Student > Bachelor 22 9%
Other 12 5%
Other 31 13%
Unknown 28 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 78 34%
Social Sciences 45 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 29 13%
Business, Management and Accounting 13 6%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 8 3%
Other 22 9%
Unknown 37 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 March 2014.
All research outputs
#6,517,586
of 12,372,945 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#2,149
of 4,083 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#59,192
of 150,946 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#6
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,372,945 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,083 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 150,946 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.