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Pancreatic cancer risk in relation to sex, lifestyle factors, and pre-diagnostic anthropometry in the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study

Overview of attention for article published in Biology of Sex Differences, December 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#49 of 164)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
27 Mendeley
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Title
Pancreatic cancer risk in relation to sex, lifestyle factors, and pre-diagnostic anthropometry in the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study
Published in
Biology of Sex Differences, December 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13293-016-0120-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gustav Andersson, Christoffer Wennersten, Signe Borgquist, Karin Jirström, Gustav Andersson, Christoffer Wennersten, Signe Borgquist, Karin Jirström

Abstract

Lifestyle factors may influence the risk of developing pancreatic cancer. Whereas cigarette smoking is an established risk factor, the effects of high alcohol intake and obesity are more uncertain. The aim of the present study was to examine the associations of pre-diagnostic anthropometry, alcohol consumption, and smoking habits with pancreatic cancer risk in a Swedish prospective, population-based cohort, with particular reference to potential sex differences. The studied cohort consists of 28,098 participants, including all incident cases of pancreatic cancer, in the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study up until December 31, 2013 (n = 163). Non-parametric and chi-squared tests were applied to compare the distribution of risk factors between cases and non-cases. Cox regression proportional hazards models were used to estimate the relationship between investigative factors and pancreatic cancer risk. Anthropometric factors included height, weight, body mass index (BMI), waist and hip circumference, waist-hip ratio (WHR), and body fat percentage. BMI was not a significant risk factor for pancreatic cancer, but a higher WHR was significantly associated with an increased risk in the entire cohort (hazard ratio (HR) 2.36, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.28-4.35, p for trend = 0.009). Regular smoking was a significant risk factor among both women (HR 2.62, 95% CI 1.61-4.27) and men (HR 3.57, 95% CI 1.70-7.47), whereas occasional smoking was a significant risk factor only in women (HR 3.29, 95% CI 1.50-7.19). Passive smoking at work for >20 years was significantly associated with an increased risk in the entire cohort (HR 1.73, 95% CI 1.15-2.58) and in women selectively (HR 2.01, 95% CI 1.21-3.31). Alcohol consumption was not a significant risk factor. A significant interaction was found between female sex and age (p = 0.045), but no other factor, in relation to pancreatic cancer risk. WHR was the only pre-diagnostic anthropometric factor associated with pancreatic cancer risk, with no sex-related differences. Regular smoking was confirmed as a significant risk factor in both sexes, whereas occasional and passive smoking were significant risk factors only in women. Despite the lack of a significant interaction between smoking and sex in relation with pancreatic cancer risk, potential sex differences should be considered in future epidemiological studies.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 27 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 5 19%
Student > Master 3 11%
Student > Postgraduate 2 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 7%
Researcher 2 7%
Other 4 15%
Unknown 9 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 11%
Chemistry 2 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 4%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 11 41%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 February 2017.
All research outputs
#1,392,448
of 9,107,880 outputs
Outputs from Biology of Sex Differences
#49
of 164 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#59,117
of 254,955 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biology of Sex Differences
#4
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,107,880 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 164 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 254,955 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.