↓ Skip to main content

Incidence of entanglements with marine debris by northern gannets (Morus bassanus) in the non-breeding grounds

Overview of attention for article published in Marine Pollution Bulletin, October 2013
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
54 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
18 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
122 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Incidence of entanglements with marine debris by northern gannets (Morus bassanus) in the non-breeding grounds
Published in
Marine Pollution Bulletin, October 2013
DOI 10.1016/j.marpolbul.2013.07.003
Pubmed ID
Authors

Beneharo Rodríguez, Juan Bécares, Airam Rodríguez, José Manuel Arcos

Abstract

The quantification of entanglements of megafauna with plastic debris at sea is difficult to assess for several reasons, such as detection and reporting biases. We used standardized vessel based counts to describe and quantify the occurrence of marine debris entanglements in northern gannets Morus bassanus at five of its main wintering areas. We observed 34 entangled birds in total, representing 0.93% of all gannets counted (n=3672 individuals). The incidence of entanglements largely varied geographically, being exceptionally high off Mauritania (20.2% of the birds in late spring). Most birds affected were immature (1.88% compared to 0.06% in adults), which in turn represented 52.4% of all the birds. Entanglements in the lower bill mandible were the most frequent, mainly with red-colored plastic objects. Further research is urgently needed to evaluate the impact of entanglements at the population level and its occurrence in other marine species, and to seek potential solutions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 54 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 122 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 2 2%
Malaysia 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 115 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 20%
Researcher 23 19%
Student > Master 23 19%
Student > Bachelor 16 13%
Other 8 7%
Other 18 15%
Unknown 10 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 51 42%
Environmental Science 38 31%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 8 7%
Social Sciences 4 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 2%
Other 4 3%
Unknown 15 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 35. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 April 2019.
All research outputs
#514,628
of 14,068,700 outputs
Outputs from Marine Pollution Bulletin
#170
of 5,097 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,615
of 156,573 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Marine Pollution Bulletin
#6
of 126 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,068,700 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,097 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 156,573 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 126 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.