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Comparison of associated features and drug treatment between co-occurring unipolar and bipolar disorders in depressed eating disorder patients

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychiatry, February 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

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67 Mendeley
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Title
Comparison of associated features and drug treatment between co-occurring unipolar and bipolar disorders in depressed eating disorder patients
Published in
BMC Psychiatry, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12888-017-1243-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mei-Chih Meg Tseng, Chin-Hao Chang, Shih-Cheng Liao, Hsi-Chung Chen

Abstract

To examine the differences of associated characteristics and prescription drug use between co-occurring unipolar and bipolar disorders in patients with eating disorders (EDs). Patients with EDs and major depressive episode (MDE) were recruited from psychiatric outpatient clinics. They were interviewed and completed self-administered measures assessing eating and general psychopathology. The prescribed drugs at the index outpatient visit were recorded. Clinical characteristics and prescription drugs of groups with major depressive disorder (ED-MDD), MDE with lifetime mania (ED-BP I), and MDE with lifetime hypomania (ED-BP II) were compared. Continuous variables between groups were compared using generalized linear regression with adjustments of age, gender, and ED subtype for pair-wise comparisons. Multivariate logistic regression with adjustments of age, gender, and ED subtype was employed to estimate adjusted odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals between groups. Two hundred and twenty-seven patients with EDs had a current MDE. Among them, 17.2% and 24.2% experienced associated manic and hypomanic episodes, respectively. Bipolar I and II patients displayed significantly poorer weight regulation, more severe impulsivity and emotional lability, and higher rates of co-occurring alcohol use disorders than ED-MDD patients. ED-BP I patients were found to have the lowest IQ, poorest working memory, and the most severe depression, suicidality and functional impairment among all patients. Patients with ED-BP II shared affect and behavioral dysregulations with ED-BP I, but had less severe degrees of cognitive and functional impairments than ED-BP I. Patients with ED-BP I were significantly less likely than those in the ED-MDD and ED-BP II groups to be on antidepressant monotherapy, but a great rate (27%) of ED-BP I individuals taking antidepressant monotherapy had potential risk of mood switch during the course of treatment. Our study identified discriminative features of bipolar I and II disorders from MDD among a group of depressed ED patients. We suggest that the associated mania, hypomania, and mood lability are predictors of clinical severity and should be identified from ED patients presented with depressive features. Accurate diagnosis of bipolar disorders may have implications for pharmacotherapy in patients with EDs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 67 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 67 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 15%
Student > Bachelor 9 13%
Student > Postgraduate 8 12%
Student > Master 8 12%
Researcher 7 10%
Other 13 19%
Unknown 12 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 36 54%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 15%
Computer Science 2 3%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 3%
Social Sciences 2 3%
Other 2 3%
Unknown 13 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 May 2019.
All research outputs
#4,641,335
of 15,115,606 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychiatry
#1,664
of 3,369 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#96,072
of 260,246 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychiatry
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,115,606 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 69th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,369 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 260,246 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them