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Persistent organic pollutants in the Atlantic and southern oceans and oceanic atmosphere

Overview of attention for article published in Science of the Total Environment, April 2017
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Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
46 Mendeley
Title
Persistent organic pollutants in the Atlantic and southern oceans and oceanic atmosphere
Published in
Science of the Total Environment, April 2017
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.12.189
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jenna L. Luek, Rebecca M. Dickhut, Michele A. Cochran, Renee L. Falconer, Henrik Kylin

Abstract

Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) continue to cycle through the atmosphere and hydrosphere despite banned or severely restricted usages. Global scale analyses of POPs are challenging, but knowledge of the current distribution of these compounds is needed to understand the movement and long-term consequences of their global use. In the current study, air and seawater samples were collected Oct. 2007-Jan. 2008 aboard the Icebreaker Oden en route from Göteborg, Sweden to McMurdo Station, Antarctica. Both air and surface seawater samples consistently contained α-hexachlorocyclohexane (α-HCH), γ-HCH, hexachlorobenzene (HCB), α-Endosulfan, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Sample concentrations for most POPs in air were higher in the northern hemisphere with the exception of HCB, which had high gas phase concentrations in the northern and southern latitudes and low concentrations near the equator. South Atlantic and Southern Ocean seawater had a high ratio of α-HCH to γ-HCH, indicating persisting levels from technical grade sources. The Atlantic and Southern Ocean continue to be net sinks for atmospheric α-, γ-HCH, and Endosulfan despite declining usage.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 46 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 35%
Student > Master 8 17%
Unspecified 6 13%
Student > Bachelor 5 11%
Researcher 4 9%
Other 7 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 16 35%
Chemistry 10 22%
Unspecified 9 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Other 4 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 February 2017.
All research outputs
#7,366,505
of 12,269,384 outputs
Outputs from Science of the Total Environment
#5,141
of 8,421 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#138,697
of 259,262 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science of the Total Environment
#146
of 238 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,269,384 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,421 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 259,262 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 238 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.