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Patient-centeredness to anticipate and organize an end-of-life project for patients receiving at-home palliative care: a phenomenological study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Family Practice, February 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

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64 Mendeley
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Title
Patient-centeredness to anticipate and organize an end-of-life project for patients receiving at-home palliative care: a phenomenological study
Published in
BMC Family Practice, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12875-017-0602-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Agnès Oude Engberink, Mélanie Badin, Philippe Serayet, Sylvain Pavageau, François Lucas, Gérard Bourrel, Joanna Norton, Grégory Ninot, Pierre Senesse

Abstract

The development of end-of-life primary care is a socio-medical and ethical challenge. However, general practitioners (GPs) face many difficulties when initiating appropriate discussion on proactive shared palliative care. Anticipating palliative care is increasingly important given the ageing population and is an aim shared by many countries. We aimed to examine how French GPs approached and provided at-home palliative care. We inquired about their strategy for delivering care, and the skills and resources they used to devise new care strategies. Twenty-one GPs from the South of France recruited by phone according to their various experiences of palliative care agreed to participate. Semi-structured interview transcripts were examined using a phenomenological approach inspired by Grounded theory, and further studied with semiopragmatic analysis. Offering palliative care was perceived by GPs as a moral obligation. They felt vindicated in a process rooted in the paradigm values of their profession. This study results in two key findings: firstly, their patient-centred approach facilitated the anticipatory discussions of any potential event or intervention, which the GPs openly discussed with patients and their relatives; secondly, this approach contributed to build an "end-of-life project" meeting patients' wishes and needs. The GPs all shared the idea that the end-of-life process required human presence and recommended that at-home care be coordinated and shared by multi-professional referring teams. The main tenets of palliative care as provided by GPs are a patient-centred approach in the anticipatory discussion of potential events, personalized follow-up with referring multi-professional teams, and the collaborative design of an end-of-life project meeting the aspirations of the patient and his or her family. Consequently, coordination strategies involving specialized teams, GPs and families should be modelled according to the specificities of each care system.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 64 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 64 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 23%
Student > Bachelor 8 13%
Researcher 6 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 8%
Other 4 6%
Other 13 20%
Unknown 13 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 28%
Nursing and Health Professions 16 25%
Social Sciences 8 13%
Psychology 2 3%
Sports and Recreations 1 2%
Other 2 3%
Unknown 17 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 February 2018.
All research outputs
#3,579,985
of 12,455,224 outputs
Outputs from BMC Family Practice
#520
of 1,247 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#90,154
of 251,537 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Family Practice
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,455,224 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 71st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,247 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 251,537 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them