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Single- and multiple viral respiratory infections in children: disease and management cannot be related to a specific pathogen

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, January 2017
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Title
Single- and multiple viral respiratory infections in children: disease and management cannot be related to a specific pathogen
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12879-016-2118-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jérôme O. Wishaupt, Tjeerd van der Ploeg, Ronald de Groot, Florens G. A. Versteegh, Nico G. Hartwig

Abstract

The number of viral pathogens associated with pediatric acute respiratory tract infection (ARI) has grown since the introduction of reverse transcription real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays. Multiple viruses are detected during a single ARI episode in approximately a quarter of all cases. The clinical relevance of these multiple detections is unclear, as is the role of the individual virus. We therefore investigated the correlation between clinical data and RT-PCR results in children with single- and multiple viral ARI. Data from children with ARI were prospectively collected during two winter seasons. RT-PCR testing for 15 viruses was performed in 560 ARI episodes. In the patients with a single-viral etiology, clinical data, laboratory findings, patient management- and outcome data were compared between the different viruses. With this information, we compared data from children of whom RT-PCR data were negative, with children with single- and multiple viral positive results. The viral detection rate was 457/560 (81.6%) of which 331/560 (59.1%) were single infections and 126/560 (22.5%) were multiple infections. In single viral infections, some statistically significant differences in demographics, clinical findings, disease severity and outcome were found between children with different viral etiologies. However, no clinically recognizable pattern was established to be virus-specific. In a multivariate analysis, the only variables that were correlated with longer hospital stay were the use of oxygen and nebulizer therapy, irrespective of the viral pathogen. Children with RT-PCR positive test results had a significant higher disease severity, fever, length of hospital stay, days of extra oxygen supply, and days of antibiotic treatment than children with a negative RT-PCR test result. For children with single- versus children with multiple positive RT-PCR test results, these differences were not significant. Disease (severity), management and outcome in pediatric ARI are not associated with a specific virus. Single- and multiple viral ARI do not significantly differ with regard to clinical outcome and patient management. For general pediatrics, RT-PCR assays should be restricted to pathogens for which therapy is available or otherwise may have clinical consequences. Further research with an extended panel of RT-PCR assays and a larger number of inclusions is necessary to further validate our findings.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 69 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 69 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 23%
Researcher 12 17%
Student > Postgraduate 8 12%
Student > Bachelor 7 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 7%
Other 12 17%
Unknown 9 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 29 42%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 9%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 6%
Computer Science 4 6%
Other 8 12%
Unknown 13 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 February 2017.
All research outputs
#6,626,363
of 9,128,382 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#2,612
of 4,013 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#171,456
of 253,795 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#79
of 130 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,128,382 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,013 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 253,795 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 130 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.