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Hippocampal Contributions to Language: Evidence of Referential Processing Deficits in Amnesia.

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Experimental Psychology. General, January 2013
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Title
Hippocampal Contributions to Language: Evidence of Referential Processing Deficits in Amnesia.
Published in
Journal of Experimental Psychology. General, January 2013
DOI 10.1037/a0034026
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jake Kurczek, Sarah Brown-Schmidt, Melissa C. Duff

Abstract

A growing body of work suggests the hippocampus contributes to a variety of cognitive domains beyond its traditional role in memory. We propose that the hippocampus, in its capacity for relational binding, representational flexibility, and online maintenance and integration of multimodal relational representations, is a key contributor to language processing. Here we test the hypothesis that the online interpretation of pronouns is hippocampus-dependent. We combined eye tracking with neuropsychological methods, where participants (4 patients with bilateral hippocampal damage and severe declarative memory impairment, 4 patients with ventromedial prefrontal cortex [vmPFC] damage, and healthy comparison participants) viewed a scene while listening to short dialogues introducing 2 characters; for example, Melissa is playing violin for Debbie/Danny as the sun is shining overhead. She is wearing a blue/purple dress. Consistent with previous work, analysis of eye gaze showed that younger and older healthy comparison participants and the vmPFC patients rapidly identified the intended referent of the pronoun when gender uniquely identified the referent, and when it did not, they showed a preference to interpret the pronoun as referring to the first-mentioned character. By contrast, hippocampal patients, while exhibiting a similar gender effect, exhibited significant disruptions in their ability to use information about which character had been mentioned first to interpret the pronoun. This finding suggests that the hippocampus plays a role in maintaining and integrating information even over a very short discourse history. These observed disruptions in referential processing demonstrate how promiscuously the hallmark processing features of the hippocampus are used in service of a variety of cognitive domains including language.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 53 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 4%
Germany 1 2%
France 1 2%
Italy 1 2%
Norway 1 2%
Unknown 47 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 32%
Researcher 12 23%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 11%
Student > Bachelor 5 9%
Student > Master 5 9%
Other 8 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 31 58%
Neuroscience 7 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 13%
Unspecified 4 8%
Linguistics 2 4%
Other 2 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 September 2016.
All research outputs
#4,490,899
of 8,409,255 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Experimental Psychology. General
#951
of 1,506 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#60,953
of 129,526 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Experimental Psychology. General
#5
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,409,255 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,506 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.5. This one is in the 5th percentile – i.e., 5% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 129,526 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.