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Facebook use predicts declines in subjective well-being in young adults.

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, August 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#3 of 118,374)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
132 news outlets
blogs
45 blogs
twitter
1460 tweeters
facebook
347 Facebook pages
googleplus
75 Google+ users
reddit
8 Redditors
video
1 video uploader

Readers on

mendeley
785 Mendeley
citeulike
22 CiteULike
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Title
Facebook use predicts declines in subjective well-being in young adults.
Published in
PLoS ONE, August 2013
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0069841
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ethan Kross, Philippe Verduyn, Emre Demiralp, Jiyoung Park, David Seungjae Lee, Natalie Lin, Holly Shablack, John Jonides, Oscar Ybarra, Kross E, Verduyn P, Demiralp E, Park J, Lee DS, Lin N, Shablack H, Jonides J, Ybarra O, Cédric Sueur

Abstract

Over 500 million people interact daily with Facebook. Yet, whether Facebook use influences subjective well-being over time is unknown. We addressed this issue using experience-sampling, the most reliable method for measuring in-vivo behavior and psychological experience. We text-messaged people five times per day for two-weeks to examine how Facebook use influences the two components of subjective well-being: how people feel moment-to-moment and how satisfied they are with their lives. Our results indicate that Facebook use predicts negative shifts on both of these variables over time. The more people used Facebook at one time point, the worse they felt the next time we text-messaged them; the more they used Facebook over two-weeks, the more their life satisfaction levels declined over time. Interacting with other people "directly" did not predict these negative outcomes. They were also not moderated by the size of people's Facebook networks, their perceived supportiveness, motivation for using Facebook, gender, loneliness, self-esteem, or depression. On the surface, Facebook provides an invaluable resource for fulfilling the basic human need for social connection. Rather than enhancing well-being, however, these findings suggest that Facebook may undermine it.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 1,460 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 785 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 31 4%
United Kingdom 17 2%
Spain 8 1%
Germany 6 <1%
Australia 6 <1%
Brazil 6 <1%
France 5 <1%
Norway 4 <1%
Canada 4 <1%
Other 45 6%
Unknown 653 83%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 177 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 161 21%
Student > Master 143 18%
Researcher 83 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 49 6%
Other 172 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 317 40%
Social Sciences 139 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 56 7%
Computer Science 52 7%
Medicine and Dentistry 51 6%
Other 170 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2705. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 November 2017.
All research outputs
#155
of 8,644,517 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#3
of 118,374 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2
of 128,716 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#1
of 3,657 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,644,517 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 118,374 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 128,716 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,657 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.