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An Evaluation of the Left-Brain vs. Right-Brain Hypothesis with Resting State Functional Connectivity Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, August 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#34 of 118,366)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
40 news outlets
blogs
20 blogs
twitter
952 tweeters
peer_reviews
2 peer review sites
facebook
97 Facebook pages
googleplus
54 Google+ users
reddit
7 Redditors
video
2 video uploaders

Readers on

mendeley
347 Mendeley
citeulike
3 CiteULike
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Title
An Evaluation of the Left-Brain vs. Right-Brain Hypothesis with Resting State Functional Connectivity Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Published in
PLoS ONE, August 2013
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0071275
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jared A. Nielsen, Brandon A. Zielinski, Michael A. Ferguson, Janet E. Lainhart, Jeffrey S. Anderson

Abstract

Lateralized brain regions subserve functions such as language and visuospatial processing. It has been conjectured that individuals may be left-brain dominant or right-brain dominant based on personality and cognitive style, but neuroimaging data has not provided clear evidence whether such phenotypic differences in the strength of left-dominant or right-dominant networks exist. We evaluated whether strongly lateralized connections covaried within the same individuals. Data were analyzed from publicly available resting state scans for 1011 individuals between the ages of 7 and 29. For each subject, functional lateralization was measured for each pair of 7266 regions covering the gray matter at 5-mm resolution as a difference in correlation before and after inverting images across the midsagittal plane. The difference in gray matter density between homotopic coordinates was used as a regressor to reduce the effect of structural asymmetries on functional lateralization. Nine left- and 11 right-lateralized hubs were identified as peaks in the degree map from the graph of significantly lateralized connections. The left-lateralized hubs included regions from the default mode network (medial prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, and temporoparietal junction) and language regions (e.g., Broca Area and Wernicke Area), whereas the right-lateralized hubs included regions from the attention control network (e.g., lateral intraparietal sulcus, anterior insula, area MT, and frontal eye fields). Left- and right-lateralized hubs formed two separable networks of mutually lateralized regions. Connections involving only left- or only right-lateralized hubs showed positive correlation across subjects, but only for connections sharing a node. Lateralization of brain connections appears to be a local rather than global property of brain networks, and our data are not consistent with a whole-brain phenotype of greater "left-brained" or greater "right-brained" network strength across individuals. Small increases in lateralization with age were seen, but no differences in gender were observed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 952 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 347 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 12 3%
United Kingdom 10 3%
Germany 6 2%
France 4 1%
Brazil 4 1%
Japan 4 1%
Netherlands 2 <1%
Canada 2 <1%
Singapore 2 <1%
Other 9 3%
Unknown 292 84%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 67 19%
Researcher 66 19%
Student > Master 65 19%
Student > Bachelor 43 12%
Professor > Associate Professor 23 7%
Other 82 24%
Unknown 1 <1%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 118 34%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 42 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 37 11%
Neuroscience 28 8%
Social Sciences 22 6%
Other 99 29%
Unknown 1 <1%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1158. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 October 2017.
All research outputs
#1,434
of 8,642,273 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#34
of 118,366 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#22
of 128,655 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#4
of 3,663 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,642,273 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 118,366 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 128,655 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,663 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.