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Rheological measurements as a tool for monitoring the performance of high pressure and high temperature treatment of sewage sludge

Overview of attention for article published in Water Research, May 2017
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Title
Rheological measurements as a tool for monitoring the performance of high pressure and high temperature treatment of sewage sludge
Published in
Water Research, May 2017
DOI 10.1016/j.watres.2017.02.031
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kevin Hii, Raj Parthasarathy, Saeid Baroutian, Daniel J. Gapes, Nicky Eshtiaghi

Abstract

Hydrothermal processing plays a significant role in sewage sludge treatment. However, the rheological behaviour of sludge during these processes is not fully understood. A better understanding of the sludge rheology under hydrothermal processing conditions can help improve process efficiency. Moreover, sludge rheology is easier to measure than chemical analyses. If a relationship could be established, it provides a possibility of using rheological measurement as a basis for monitoring the performance of hydrothermal processing. The rheological changes in thickened waste activated sludge (7 wt%) was investigated using a pressure cell-equipped rheometer during 60-min thermal hydrolysis (TH) at various temperatures (80-145 °C) and constant pressure (5 bar). Changes in the soluble chemical oxygen demand (COD) were measured using a separate reactor with a similar operating condition. The sludge behaved as a shear-thinning fluid and could be described by the Herschel-Bulkley model. At constant temperature, the yield stress and high-shear (600 s(-1)) viscosity of sludge decreased logarithmically over 60 min. At constant time, the yield stress and the high-shear viscosity decreased linearly with increasing TH temperature and these values was much less than corresponding properties after treatment and cooling down to 25 °C. The soluble COD of sludge also increased logarithmically over 60 min at constant temperature, and increased linearly with increasing temperature at constant time. Furthermore, the yield stress and high-shear viscosity reduction showed a linear correlation with the increase in soluble COD.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
China 1 3%
Unknown 33 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 21%
Researcher 6 18%
Student > Master 4 12%
Student > Postgraduate 3 9%
Other 3 9%
Other 8 24%
Unknown 3 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Chemical Engineering 8 24%
Environmental Science 6 18%
Engineering 6 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 9%
Energy 2 6%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 6 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 March 2017.
All research outputs
#10,874,308
of 12,269,818 outputs
Outputs from Water Research
#4,680
of 5,590 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#220,246
of 259,021 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Water Research
#128
of 170 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,269,818 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,590 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 170 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.