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The Role of Universal Health Literacy Precautions in Minimizing “Medspeak” and Promoting Shared Decision Making

Overview of attention for article published in AMA Journal of Ethics, March 2017
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Mentioned by

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2 news outlets
twitter
106 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

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42 Mendeley
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Title
The Role of Universal Health Literacy Precautions in Minimizing “Medspeak” and Promoting Shared Decision Making
Published in
AMA Journal of Ethics, March 2017
DOI 10.1001/journalofethics.2017.19.3.pfor1-1703
Pubmed ID
Abstract

Shared decision making (SDM), a collaborative process whereby patients and professionals make health care decisions together, is a cornerstone of ethical patient care. The patient-clinician communication necessary to achieve SDM depends on many factors, not the least of which is a shared language (sometimes with the aid of a medical interpreter). However, even when a patient and clinician are speaking the same mother tongue, the use of medical jargon can pose a large and unnecessary barrier. This article discusses how health care professionals can use "universal health literacy precautions" as a legal, practical, and ethical means to enhance SDM and improve health care outcomes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 106 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 2%
Unknown 41 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 21%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 12%
Other 4 10%
Student > Bachelor 4 10%
Researcher 4 10%
Other 11 26%
Unknown 5 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 33%
Social Sciences 7 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 12%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 2%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 10 24%