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Making Management Skills a Core Component of Medical Education

Overview of attention for article published in Academic medicine, February 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#47 of 4,126)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
twitter
124 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
29 Mendeley
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Title
Making Management Skills a Core Component of Medical Education
Published in
Academic medicine, February 2017
DOI 10.1097/acm.0000000000001627
Pubmed ID
Authors

Myers, Christopher G., Pronovost, Peter J., Christopher G. Myers, Peter J. Pronovost

Abstract

Physicians are being called upon to engage in greater leadership and management in increasingly complex and dynamic health care organizations. Yet, management skills are largely undeveloped in medical education. Without formal management training in the medical curriculum, physicians are left to cultivate their leadership and management abilities through a haphazard array of training programs or simply through trial and error, with consequences that may range from frustration among staff to reduced quality of care and increased risk of patient harm. To address this issue, the authors posit that medical education needs a more systematic focus on topics related to management and organization, such as individual decision making, interpersonal communication, team knowledge sharing, and organizational culture. They encourage medical schools to partner with business school faculty or other organizational scholars to offer a "Management 101" course in the medical curriculum to provide physicians-in-training with an understanding of these topics and raise the quality of physician leadership and management in modern health care organizations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 124 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 29 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 14%
Professor 3 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 10%
Student > Bachelor 3 10%
Unspecified 3 10%
Other 13 45%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 31%
Unspecified 5 17%
Psychology 4 14%
Business, Management and Accounting 3 10%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 7%
Other 6 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 96. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 May 2018.
All research outputs
#143,059
of 12,372,633 outputs
Outputs from Academic medicine
#47
of 4,126 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,223
of 257,109 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Academic medicine
#3
of 80 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,372,633 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,126 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 257,109 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 80 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.