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Trial of labour after caesarean section and the risk of neonatal and infant death: a nationwide cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, February 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

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36 Mendeley
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Title
Trial of labour after caesarean section and the risk of neonatal and infant death: a nationwide cohort study
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12884-017-1255-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sinéad M. O’Neill, Esben Agerbo, Ali S. Khashan, Patricia M. Kearney, Tine Brink Henriksen, Richard A. Greene, Louise C. Kenny

Abstract

Caesarean section (CS) rates are increasing worldwide and as a result repeat CS is common. The optimal mode of delivery in women with one previous CS is widely debated and the risks to the infant are understudied. The aim of the current study was to evaluate if women with a trial of labour after caesarean (TOLAC) had an increased odds of neonatal and infant death compared to women with an elective repeat CS (ERCS). A population register-based cohort study was conducted in Denmark between 1982 and 2010. All women with two deliveries [in which the first was a CS, and the second was an uncomplicated, term delivery (n = 61,626)] were included in the study. Logistic regression models were used to report adjusted odds ratios (AOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of the odds of death according to mode of delivery. The main outcome measures were neonatal death (early and late) and infant death. Women with a TOLAC had an increased odds of neonatal death (AOR 1 · 87, 95% CI 1 · 12 to 3 · 12) due to an increased risk of early neonatal death (AOR 2 · 06, 95% CI 1 · 19 to 3 · 56) and no effect on late neonatal death (AOR 0 · 97, 95% CI 0 · 22 to 4 · 32), or infant death (AOR 1 · 12, 95% CI 0 · 79 to 1 · 59) when compared to the reference group of women with an ERCS. There was evidence of a cohort effect as the increased odds of neonatal death (AOR 3 · 89, 95% CI 1 · 33 to 11 · 39) was most significant in the earlier years (1982-1991) and gradually disappeared (AOR 1 · 01, 95% CI 0 · 44 to 2 · 31) in the later years (2002-2010). Although an increased risk of neonatal death was found in women with a TOLAC, there was evidence of a cohort effect, which showed this increased odds disappearing over time. Advances in modern healthcare including improved monitoring and earlier detection of underlying pregnancy complications may explain the findings.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 36 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 5 14%
Student > Master 4 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 8%
Researcher 3 8%
Other 8 22%
Unknown 9 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 19 53%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 19%
Psychology 1 3%
Unknown 9 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 October 2017.
All research outputs
#8,230,297
of 15,681,050 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#1,668
of 2,881 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#111,042
of 261,586 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,681,050 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,881 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.4. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 261,586 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them