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Investigating the Microbial Degradation Potential in Oil Sands Fluid Fine Tailings Using Gamma Irradiation: A Metagenomic Perspective

Overview of attention for article published in Microbial Ecology, March 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (54th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
37 Mendeley
Title
Investigating the Microbial Degradation Potential in Oil Sands Fluid Fine Tailings Using Gamma Irradiation: A Metagenomic Perspective
Published in
Microbial Ecology, March 2017
DOI 10.1007/s00248-017-0953-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Danielle VanMensel, Subba Rao Chaganti, Ryan Boudens, Thomas Reid, Jan Ciborowski, Christopher Weisener

Abstract

Open-pit mining of the Athabasca oil sands has generated large volumes of waste termed fluid fine tailings (FFT), stored in tailings ponds. Accumulation of toxic organic substances in the tailings ponds is one of the biggest concerns. Gamma irradiation (GI) treatment could accelerate the biodegradation of toxic organic substances. Hence, this research investigates the response of the microbial consortia in GI-treated FFT materials with an emphasis on changes in diversity and organism-related stimuli. FFT materials from aged and fresh ponds were used in the study under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Variations in the microbial diversity in GI-treated FFT materials were monitored for 52 weeks and significant stimuli (p < 0.05) were observed. Chemoorganotrophic organisms dominated in fresh and aged ponds and showed increased relative abundance resulting from GI treatment. GI-treated anaerobic FFTaged reported stimulus of organisms with biodegradation potential (e.g., Pseudomonas, Enterobacter) and methylotrophic capabilities (e.g., Syntrophus, Smithella). In comparison, GI-treated anaerobic FFTfresh stimulated Desulfuromonas as the principle genus at 52 weeks. Under aerobic conditions, GI-treated FFTaged showed stimulation of organisms capable of sulfur and iron cycling (e.g., Geobacter). However, GI-treated aerobic FFTfresh showed no stimulus at 52 weeks. This research provides an enhanced understanding of oil sands tailings biogeochemistry and the impacts of GI treatment on microorganisms as an effect for targeting toxic organics. The outcomes of this study highlight the potential for this approach to accelerate stabilization and reclamation end points. Graphical Abstract.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 37 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 19%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 14%
Researcher 4 11%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Other 5 14%
Unknown 3 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 8 22%
Engineering 5 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 14%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 5%
Other 5 14%
Unknown 7 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 January 2018.
All research outputs
#1,861,212
of 12,379,581 outputs
Outputs from Microbial Ecology
#253
of 1,187 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#57,938
of 256,635 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Microbial Ecology
#17
of 37 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,379,581 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,187 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 256,635 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 37 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.