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A place for play? The influence of the home physical environment on children’s physical activity and sedentary behaviour

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, January 2013
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
103 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
266 Mendeley
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Title
A place for play? The influence of the home physical environment on children’s physical activity and sedentary behaviour
Published in
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, January 2013
DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-10-99
Pubmed ID
Authors

Clover Maitland, Gareth Stratton, Sarah Foster, Rebecca Braham, Michael Rosenberg

Abstract

The home environment is an important influence on the sedentary behaviour and physical activity of children, who have limited independent mobility and spend much of their time at home. This article reviews the current evidence regarding the influence of the home physical environment on the sedentary behaviour and physical activity of children aged 8-14 years. A literature search of peer reviewed articles published between 2005 and 2011 resulted in 38 observational studies (21 with activity outcomes, 23 with sedentary outcomes) and 11 experimental studies included in the review. The most commonly investigated behavioural outcomes were television watching and moderate to vigorous physical activity. Media equipment in the home and to a lesser extent the bedroom were positively associated with children's sedentary behaviour. Physical activity equipment and the house and yard were not associated with physical activity, although environmental measures were exclusively self-reported. On the other hand, physical activity equipment was inversely associated with sedentary behaviours in half of studies. Observational studies that investigated the influence of the physical and social environment within the home space, found that the social environment, particularly the role of parents, was important. Experimental studies that changed the home physical environment by introducing a television limiting device successfully decreased television viewing, whereas the influence of introducing an active video game on activity outcomes was inconsistent. Results highlight that the home environment is an important influence on children's sedentary behaviour and physical activity, about which much is still unknown. While changing or controlling the home physical environment shows promise for reducing screen based sedentary behaviour, further interventions are needed to understand the broader impact of these changes. Future studies should prioritise investigating the influence of the home physical environment, and its interaction with the social environment, on objectively measured sedentary time and home context specific behaviours, ideally including technologies that allow objective measures of the home space.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 266 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 4 2%
Netherlands 3 1%
Spain 2 <1%
Ireland 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Indonesia 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Finland 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 251 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 70 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 49 18%
Researcher 26 10%
Student > Bachelor 20 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 19 7%
Other 48 18%
Unknown 34 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 48 18%
Social Sciences 41 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 41 15%
Psychology 20 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 17 6%
Other 52 20%
Unknown 47 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 August 2013.
All research outputs
#8,043,470
of 15,428,073 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#1,278
of 1,531 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#67,231
of 161,795 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#10
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,428,073 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,531 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.7. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 161,795 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.