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The structural and functional connectivity of the amygdala: From normal emotion to pathological anxiety

Overview of attention for article published in Behavioural Brain Research, October 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
1 tweeter
patent
1 patent

Citations

dimensions_citation
469 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
881 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
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Title
The structural and functional connectivity of the amygdala: From normal emotion to pathological anxiety
Published in
Behavioural Brain Research, October 2011
DOI 10.1016/j.bbr.2011.04.025
Pubmed ID
Authors

M. Justin Kim, Rebecca A. Loucks, Amy L. Palmer, Annemarie C. Brown, Kimberly M. Solomon, Ashley N. Marchante, Paul J. Whalen

Abstract

The dynamic interactions between the amygdala and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) are usefully conceptualized as a circuit that both allows us to react automatically to biologically relevant predictive stimuli as well as regulate these reactions when the situation calls for it. In this review, we will begin by discussing the role of this amygdala-mPFC circuitry in the conditioning and extinction of aversive learning in animals. We will then relate these data to emotional regulation paradigms in humans. Finally, we will consider how these processes are compromised in normal and pathological anxiety. We conclude that the capacity for efficient crosstalk between the amygdala and the mPFC, which is represented as the strength of the amygdala-mPFC circuitry, is crucial to beneficial outcomes in terms of reported anxiety.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 881 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 16 2%
Germany 7 <1%
Canada 7 <1%
United Kingdom 6 <1%
Switzerland 4 <1%
Brazil 3 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
Austria 2 <1%
Netherlands 2 <1%
Other 23 3%
Unknown 809 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 255 29%
Researcher 147 17%
Student > Master 131 15%
Student > Bachelor 90 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 64 7%
Other 194 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 317 36%
Neuroscience 165 19%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 146 17%
Unspecified 100 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 85 10%
Other 68 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 July 2018.
All research outputs
#1,268,997
of 13,304,005 outputs
Outputs from Behavioural Brain Research
#220
of 3,429 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#16,889
of 157,633 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Behavioural Brain Research
#7
of 77 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,304,005 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,429 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 157,633 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 77 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.