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Climate related sea-level variations over the past two millennia

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, June 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
22 news outlets
blogs
17 blogs
policy
2 policy sources
twitter
528 tweeters
googleplus
5 Google+ users
video
2 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
232 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
386 Mendeley
citeulike
3 CiteULike
Title
Climate related sea-level variations over the past two millennia
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, June 2011
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1015619108
Pubmed ID
Authors

A. C. Kemp, B. P. Horton, J. P. Donnelly, M. E. Mann, M. Vermeer, S. Rahmstorf

Abstract

We present new sea-level reconstructions for the past 2100 y based on salt-marsh sedimentary sequences from the US Atlantic coast. The data from North Carolina reveal four phases of persistent sea-level change after correction for glacial isostatic adjustment. Sea level was stable from at least BC 100 until AD 950. Sea level then increased for 400 y at a rate of 0.6 mm/y, followed by a further period of stable, or slightly falling, sea level that persisted until the late 19th century. Since then, sea level has risen at an average rate of 2.1 mm/y, representing the steepest century-scale increase of the past two millennia. This rate was initiated between AD 1865 and 1892. Using an extended semiempirical modeling approach, we show that these sea-level changes are consistent with global temperature for at least the past millennium.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 528 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 386 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 19 5%
Germany 11 3%
Brazil 4 1%
Portugal 2 <1%
New Zealand 2 <1%
Canada 2 <1%
Netherlands 2 <1%
Jamaica 2 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Other 14 4%
Unknown 327 85%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 88 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 78 20%
Student > Master 50 13%
Professor 32 8%
Student > Bachelor 31 8%
Other 107 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 155 40%
Environmental Science 90 23%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 55 14%
Unspecified 35 9%
Engineering 20 5%
Other 31 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 578. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 May 2019.
All research outputs
#11,657
of 13,238,088 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#398
of 79,746 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11,438
of 12,606,517 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#398
of 79,559 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,238,088 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 79,746 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 12,606,517 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 79,559 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.