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Per os infectivity of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) in white-legged shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) and role of peritrophic membrane

Overview of attention for article published in Veterinary Research, February 2016
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Title
Per os infectivity of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) in white-legged shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) and role of peritrophic membrane
Published in
Veterinary Research, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13567-016-0321-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Khuong Van Thuong, Vo Van Tuan, Wenfeng Li, Patrick Sorgeloos, Peter Bossier, Hans Nauwynck

Abstract

As earlier observations on peroral infectivity of WSSV in white-legged shrimp are conflicting, here, a standardized peroral intubation technique was used to examine (i) the role of the physical composition of the viral inoculum and (ii) the barrier function of the PM. In a first experiment, the infectivity of a WSSV stock was compared by determining the SID50 by intramuscular injection, peroral inoculation or via feeding. The following titers were obtained: 10(8.77) SID50/g by intramuscular injection, 10(1.23) SID50/g by peroral inoculation and 10(0.73) SID50/g by feeding. These results demonstrated that 10(7.54)-10(8.03) infectious virus is needed to infect shrimp by peroral inoculation and via feeding. Next, it was examined if damage of the PM may increase the susceptibility for WSSV by peroral route. The infectivity of a virus stock was tested upon peroral inoculation of shrimp with and without removal of the PM and compared with the infectivity upon intramuscular inoculation. The virus titers obtained upon intramuscular injection and peroral inoculation of shrimp with and without PM were 10(8.63), 10(1.13) and 10(1.53) SID50/mL, respectively. This experiment confirmed the need of 10(7.1)-10(7.5) infectious virus to infect shrimp via peroral route and showed that the removal of the PM slightly but not significantly (p > 0.05) facilitated the infection of shrimp. This study indicated that WSSV contaminated feed is poorly infectious via peroral route, whereas it is highly infectious when injected into shrimp. The PM plays a minor role as internal barrier of shrimp against WSSV infection.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 2%
Unknown 47 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 17%
Student > Master 8 17%
Professor 5 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 10%
Lecturer 4 8%
Other 8 17%
Unknown 10 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 46%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 15%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 4%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 2%
Arts and Humanities 1 2%
Other 4 8%
Unknown 11 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 June 2017.
All research outputs
#13,993,188
of 15,869,024 outputs
Outputs from Veterinary Research
#867
of 957 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#224,800
of 262,411 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Veterinary Research
#4
of 4 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 957 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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