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Musk gland seasonal development and musk secretion are regulated by the testis in muskrat (Ondatra zibethicus)

Overview of attention for article published in Biological Research, March 2017
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Title
Musk gland seasonal development and musk secretion are regulated by the testis in muskrat (Ondatra zibethicus)
Published in
Biological Research, March 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40659-017-0116-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tianxiang Zhang, Dong Peng, Lei Qi, Weixuan Li, Mengyuan Fan, Jiachen Shen, Liangliang Yang, Yihua Wang, Wenxia Wang, Xiaolong Hu, Ruibo Cai, Ran Zhou, Yuting Wei, Juntong Zhou, Shuang Yang, Defu Hu, Shuqiang Liu

Abstract

The muskrat is a seasonal breeder. Males secrete musk to attract females during the breeding season. The testosterone binding to the androgen receptor (AR) in musk glands of muskrat may play an important role conducting the musk secretion process. The musk gland, testis and blood samples of musk rats are collected in both breeding and non-breeding seasons. Some part of the samples are kept in liquid nitrogen for transcriptome analysis and Western blotting test. Some part of the samples are kept in 70% alcohol for histology experiment, blood samples are kept at -20 °C for the serum testosterone measurement experiment. This study demonstrates that the quantity of secreted musk, the volume of the musk glands, the diameter of the gland cells and AR expression are all higher during the breeding season than at other times (p < 0.01). StAR, P450scc and 3β-HSD expression in the Leydig cells of the testis were also higher during this season, as was serum testosterone. AR was also observed in the gland cells of two other musk-secreting animals, the musk deer and small Indian civet, in their musk glands. These results suggest that the testes and musk glands co-develop seasonally. The musk glands' seasonal development and musk secretion are regulated by the testes, and testosterone plays an important role in the seasonal development of musk glands.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 14 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 21%
Student > Bachelor 2 14%
Professor 2 14%
Researcher 2 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 7%
Other 2 14%
Unknown 2 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 50%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 14%
Environmental Science 2 14%
Unknown 3 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 March 2017.
All research outputs
#7,935,747
of 9,153,782 outputs
Outputs from Biological Research
#215
of 248 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#214,530
of 253,474 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biological Research
#4
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,153,782 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 248 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.8. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.