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Metabolic rate and body size are linked with perception of temporal information

Overview of attention for article published in Animal Behaviour, August 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#6 of 3,304)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Readers on

mendeley
227 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Metabolic rate and body size are linked with perception of temporal information
Published in
Animal Behaviour, August 2013
DOI 10.1016/j.anbehav.2013.06.018
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kevin Healy, Luke McNally, Graeme D. Ruxton, Natalie Cooper, Andrew L. Jackson, Healy K, McNally L, Ruxton GD, Cooper N, Jackson AL

Abstract

Body size and metabolic rate both fundamentally constrain how species interact with their environment, and hence ultimately affect their niche. While many mechanisms leading to these constraints have been explored, their effects on the resolution at which temporal information is perceived have been largely overlooked. The visual system acts as a gateway to the dynamic environment and the relative resolution at which organisms are able to acquire and process visual information is likely to restrict their ability to interact with events around them. As both smaller size and higher metabolic rates should facilitate rapid behavioural responses, we hypothesized that these traits would favour perception of temporal change over finer timescales. Using critical flicker fusion frequency, the lowest frequency of flashing at which a flickering light source is perceived as constant, as a measure of the maximum rate of temporal information processing in the visual system, we carried out a phylogenetic comparative analysis of a wide range of vertebrates that supported this hypothesis. Our results have implications for the evolution of signalling systems and predator-prey interactions, and, combined with the strong influence that both body mass and metabolism have on a species' ecological niche, suggest that time perception may constitute an important and overlooked dimension of niche differentiation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 104 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 227 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 6 3%
United States 6 3%
Brazil 5 2%
Portugal 3 1%
Germany 2 <1%
France 2 <1%
Netherlands 2 <1%
Hungary 2 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Other 7 3%
Unknown 191 84%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 63 28%
Researcher 50 22%
Student > Master 40 18%
Student > Bachelor 19 8%
Professor 17 7%
Other 38 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 128 56%
Psychology 34 15%
Neuroscience 13 6%
Unspecified 10 4%
Environmental Science 9 4%
Other 33 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 282. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 August 2017.
All research outputs
#23,442
of 8,516,187 outputs
Outputs from Animal Behaviour
#6
of 3,304 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#341
of 132,880 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Animal Behaviour
#1
of 66 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,516,187 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,304 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 132,880 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 66 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.