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Identifying the appropriate time for deep brain stimulation to achieve spatial memory improvement on the Morris water maze

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Neuroscience, March 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (69th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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5 Dimensions

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24 Mendeley
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Title
Identifying the appropriate time for deep brain stimulation to achieve spatial memory improvement on the Morris water maze
Published in
BMC Neuroscience, March 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12868-017-0345-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Da Un Jeong, Jihyeon Lee, Won Seok Chang, Jin Woo Chang

Abstract

The possibility of using deep brain stimulation (DBS) for memory enhancement has recently been reported, but the precise underlying mechanisms of its effects remain unknown. Our previous study suggested that spatial memory improvement by medial septum (MS)-DBS may be associated with cholinergic regulation and neurogenesis. However, the affected stage of memory could not be distinguished because the stimulation was delivered during the execution of all memory processes. Therefore, this study was performed to determine the stage of memory affected by MS-DBS. Rats were administered 192 IgG-saporin to lesion cholinergic neurons. Stimulation was delivered at different times in different groups of rats: 5 days before the Morris water maze test (pre-stimulation), 5 days during the training phase of the Morris water maze test (training-stimulation), and 2 h before the Morris water maze probe test (probe-stimulation). A fourth group of rats was lesioned but received no stimulation. These four groups were compared with a normal (control) group. The most effective memory restoration occurred in the pre-stimulation group. Moreover, the pre-stimulation group exhibited better recall of the platform position than the other stimulation groups. An increase in the level of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was observed in the pre-stimulation group; this increase was maintained for 1 week. However, acetylcholinesterase activity in the pre-stimulation group was not significantly different from the lesion group. Memory impairment due to cholinergic denervation can be improved by DBS. The improvement is significantly correlated with the up-regulation of BDNF expression and neurogenesis. Based on the results of this study, the use of MS-DBS during the early stage of disease may restore spatial memory impairment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 4%
Unknown 23 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 25%
Student > Master 3 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 8%
Researcher 2 8%
Lecturer 2 8%
Other 7 29%
Unknown 2 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 9 38%
Psychology 3 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 8%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 4 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 March 2017.
All research outputs
#5,367,042
of 10,444,782 outputs
Outputs from BMC Neuroscience
#407
of 936 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#116,769
of 256,288 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Neuroscience
#7
of 23 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 10,444,782 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 936 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 256,288 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 23 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.