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Expanding the primate body schema in sensorimotor cortex by virtual touches of an avatar

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, August 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
9 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
24 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Readers on

mendeley
233 Mendeley
citeulike
3 CiteULike
Title
Expanding the primate body schema in sensorimotor cortex by virtual touches of an avatar
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, August 2013
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1308459110
Pubmed ID
Authors

S. Shokur, J. E. O'Doherty, J. A. Winans, H. Bleuler, M. A. Lebedev, M. A. L. Nicolelis

Abstract

The brain representation of the body, called the body schema, is susceptible to plasticity. For instance, subjects experiencing a rubber hand illusion develop a sense of ownership of a mannequin hand when they view it being touched while tactile stimuli are simultaneously applied to their own hand. Here, the cortical basis of such an embodiment was investigated through concurrent recordings from primary somatosensory (i.e., S1) and motor (i.e., M1) cortical neuronal ensembles while two monkeys observed an avatar arm being touched by a virtual ball. Following a period when virtual touches occurred synchronously with physical brushes of the monkeys' arms, neurons in S1 and M1 started to respond to virtual touches applied alone. Responses to virtual touch occurred 50 to 70 ms later than to physical touch, consistent with the involvement of polysynaptic pathways linking the visual cortex to S1 and M1. We propose that S1 and M1 contribute to the rubber hand illusion and that, by taking advantage of plasticity in these areas, patients may assimilate neuroprosthetic limbs as parts of their body schema.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 24 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 233 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 9 4%
France 3 1%
United Kingdom 3 1%
Japan 3 1%
Switzerland 2 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Austria 1 <1%
Singapore 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Other 2 <1%
Unknown 207 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 65 28%
Researcher 46 20%
Student > Master 30 13%
Student > Bachelor 24 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 17 7%
Other 35 15%
Unknown 16 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 50 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 38 16%
Neuroscience 36 15%
Engineering 29 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 21 9%
Other 27 12%
Unknown 32 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 100. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 March 2017.
All research outputs
#184,725
of 14,565,263 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#4,125
of 82,691 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,146
of 160,424 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#84
of 904 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,565,263 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 82,691 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 26.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 160,424 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 904 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.