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Cerebral organoids model human brain development and microcephaly

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, August 2013
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Citations

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2884 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
5135 Mendeley
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11 CiteULike
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Title
Cerebral organoids model human brain development and microcephaly
Published in
Nature, August 2013
DOI 10.1038/nature12517
Pubmed ID
Authors

Madeline A. Lancaster, Magdalena Renner, Carol-Anne Martin, Daniel Wenzel, Louise S. Bicknell, Matthew E. Hurles, Tessa Homfray, Josef M. Penninger, Andrew P. Jackson, Juergen A. Knoblich

Abstract

The complexity of the human brain has made it difficult to study many brain disorders in model organisms, highlighting the need for an in vitro model of human brain development. Here we have developed a human pluripotent stem cell-derived three-dimensional organoid culture system, termed cerebral organoids, that develop various discrete, although interdependent, brain regions. These include a cerebral cortex containing progenitor populations that organize and produce mature cortical neuron subtypes. Furthermore, cerebral organoids are shown to recapitulate features of human cortical development, namely characteristic progenitor zone organization with abundant outer radial glial stem cells. Finally, we use RNA interference and patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells to model microcephaly, a disorder that has been difficult to recapitulate in mice. We demonstrate premature neuronal differentiation in patient organoids, a defect that could help to explain the disease phenotype. Together, these data show that three-dimensional organoids can recapitulate development and disease even in this most complex human tissue.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 625 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 5,135 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 49 <1%
United Kingdom 25 <1%
Japan 12 <1%
Germany 11 <1%
France 9 <1%
Netherlands 8 <1%
Australia 7 <1%
Spain 5 <1%
Italy 5 <1%
Other 42 <1%
Unknown 4962 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 1090 21%
Researcher 800 16%
Student > Bachelor 780 15%
Student > Master 681 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 223 4%
Other 676 13%
Unknown 885 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1168 23%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1093 21%
Neuroscience 675 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 349 7%
Engineering 301 6%
Other 540 11%
Unknown 1009 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1730. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 August 2022.
All research outputs
#4,534
of 21,747,565 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#550
of 88,674 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#18
of 178,123 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#5
of 1,022 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,747,565 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 88,674 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 98.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 178,123 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,022 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.