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Intestinal dysbiosis in preterm infants preceding necrotizing enterocolitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Overview of attention for article published in Microbiome, March 2017
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
44 tweeters
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1 research highlight platform

Citations

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180 Dimensions

Readers on

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245 Mendeley
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Title
Intestinal dysbiosis in preterm infants preceding necrotizing enterocolitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Published in
Microbiome, March 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40168-017-0248-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mohan Pammi, Julia Cope, Phillip I. Tarr, Barbara B. Warner, Ardythe L. Morrow, Volker Mai, Katherine E. Gregory, J. Simon Kroll, Valerie McMurtry, Michael J Ferris, Lars Engstrand, Helene Engstrand Lilja, Emily B. Hollister, James Versalovic, Josef Neu

Abstract

Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a catastrophic disease of preterm infants, and microbial dysbiosis has been implicated in its pathogenesis. Studies evaluating the microbiome in NEC and preterm infants lack power and have reported inconsistent results. Our objectives were to perform a systematic review and meta-analyses of stool microbiome profiles in preterm infants to discern and describe microbial dysbiosis prior to the onset of NEC and to explore heterogeneity among studies. We searched MEDLINE, PubMed, CINAHL, and conference abstracts from the proceedings of Pediatric Academic Societies and reference lists of relevant identified articles in April 2016. Studies comparing the intestinal microbiome in preterm infants who developed NEC to those of controls, using culture-independent molecular techniques and reported α and β-diversity metrics, and microbial profiles were included. In addition, 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) sequence data with clinical meta-data were requested from the authors of included studies or searched in public data repositories. We reprocessed the 16S rRNA sequence data through a uniform analysis pipeline, which were then synthesized by meta-analysis. We included 14 studies in this review, and data from eight studies were available for quantitative synthesis (106 NEC cases, 278 controls, 2944 samples). The age of NEC onset was at a mean ± SD of 30.1 ± 2.4 weeks post-conception (n = 61). Fecal microbiome from preterm infants with NEC had increased relative abundances of Proteobacteria and decreased relative abundances of Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes prior to NEC onset. Alpha- or beta-diversity indices in preterm infants with NEC were not consistently different from controls, but we found differences in taxonomic profiles related to antibiotic exposure, formula feeding, and mode of delivery. Exploring heterogeneity revealed differences in microbial profiles by study and the target region of the 16S rRNA gene (V1-V3 or V3-V5). Microbial dysbiosis preceding NEC in preterm infants is characterized by increased relative abundances of Proteobacteria and decreased relative abundances of Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes. Microbiome optimization may provide a novel strategy for preventing NEC.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 44 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 245 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 242 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 39 16%
Researcher 34 14%
Student > Bachelor 30 12%
Student > Master 26 11%
Other 21 9%
Other 46 19%
Unknown 49 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 83 34%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 28 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 24 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 18 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 4%
Other 17 7%
Unknown 64 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 33. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 January 2019.
All research outputs
#683,666
of 16,249,318 outputs
Outputs from Microbiome
#215
of 944 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#19,718
of 262,924 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Microbiome
#2
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,249,318 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 944 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 39.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,924 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 6 of them.