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Long-term mortality among older adults with burn injury: a population-based study in Australia

Overview of attention for article published in Bulletin of the World Health Organization, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source

Citations

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51 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
58 Mendeley
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Title
Long-term mortality among older adults with burn injury: a population-based study in Australia
Published in
Bulletin of the World Health Organization, April 2015
DOI 10.2471/blt.14.149146
Pubmed ID
Authors

Janine M Duke, James H Boyd, Suzanne Rea, Sean M Randall, Fiona M Wood

Abstract

To assess if burn injury in older adults is associated with changes in long-term all-cause mortality and to estimate the increased risk of death attributable to burn injury. We conducted a population-based matched longitudinal study - based on administrative data from Western Australia's hospital morbidity data system and death register. A cohort of 6014 individuals who were aged at least 45 years when hospitalized for a first burn injury in 1980-2012 was identified. A non-injury comparison cohort, randomly selected from Western Australia's electoral roll (n = 25 759), was matched to the patients. We used Kaplan-Meier plots and Cox proportional hazards regression to analyse the data and generated mortality rate ratios and attributable risk percentages. For those hospitalized with burns, 180 (3%) died in hospital and 2498 (42%) died after discharge. Individuals with burn injury had a 1.4-fold greater mortality rate than those with no injury (95% confidence interval, CI: 1.3-1.5). In this cohort, the long-term mortality attributable to burn injury was 29%. Mortality risk was increased by both severe and minor burns, with adjusted mortality rate ratios of 1.3 (95% CI: 1.1-1.9) and 2.1 (95% CI: 1.9-2.3), respectively. Burn injury is associated with increased long-term mortality. In our study population, sole reliance on data on in-hospital deaths would lead to an underestimate of the true mortality burden associated with burn injury.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 58 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 58 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 19%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 12%
Researcher 6 10%
Student > Bachelor 6 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 9%
Other 11 19%
Unknown 12 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 25 43%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 10%
Business, Management and Accounting 3 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 3%
Materials Science 2 3%
Other 6 10%
Unknown 14 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 June 2015.
All research outputs
#5,609,060
of 17,363,630 outputs
Outputs from Bulletin of the World Health Organization
#1,858
of 3,940 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#102,311
of 267,438 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Bulletin of the World Health Organization
#34
of 51 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,363,630 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,940 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.2. This one is in the 8th percentile – i.e., 8% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,438 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 51 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 3rd percentile – i.e., 3% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.