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A gut reaction: the combined influence of exercise and diet on gastrointestinal microbiota in rats

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Applied Microbiology, May 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#21 of 2,735)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
64 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
45 Mendeley
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Title
A gut reaction: the combined influence of exercise and diet on gastrointestinal microbiota in rats
Published in
Journal of Applied Microbiology, May 2017
DOI 10.1111/jam.13442
Pubmed ID
Authors

R.B. Batacan, A.S. Fenning, V.J. Dalbo, A.T. Scanlan, M.J. Duncan, R.J. Moore, D. Stanley

Abstract

Intestinal microbiota modulates the development of clinical conditions, including metabolic syndrome and obesity. Many of these conditions are influenced by nutritional and exercise behaviours. This study aimed to investigate the ability of exercise to re-shape the intestinal microbiota and the influence of the diet on the process. A rat model was used to examine the intestinal microbiota responses to four activity conditions, including: high intensity interval training, light intensity training, sedentary and normal control, each containing two nutritional conditions: high-fat high-fructose diet (HF) and standard chow (SC) diet. No significant differences in microbiota were apparent between activity conditions in rats fed a HF diet but changes in the presence/absence of phylotypes were observed in the LIT and HIIT groups. In rats fed SC, significant differences in intestinal microbiota were evident between exercised and non-exercised rats. Both LIT and HIIT induced significant differences in intestinal microbiota in SC fed rats compared to their respective SC fed controls. Characterisation of the exercise-induced bacterial phylotypes indicated an increase in bacteria likely capable of degrading resistant polysaccharides and an increase in short chain fatty acid producers. While a significant effect of exercise on microbiota composition occurred in SC fed rats, the HF fed rats microbiota showed little response. These data suggest that a HF diet prevented microbiota differentiation in response to exercise. The importance of diet-exercise interaction is extended to the level of intestinal bacteria and gut health. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 64 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 45 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 22%
Student > Master 8 18%
Student > Bachelor 6 13%
Unspecified 5 11%
Researcher 5 11%
Other 11 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 27%
Unspecified 8 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 7%
Other 13 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 47. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 November 2018.
All research outputs
#346,748
of 13,090,166 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Applied Microbiology
#21
of 2,735 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#14,300
of 257,017 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Applied Microbiology
#2
of 43 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,090,166 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,735 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 257,017 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 43 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.