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LINE-1 is preferentially hypomethylated within adenomatous polyps in the presence of synchronous colorectal cancer

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Epigenetics, March 2017
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Title
LINE-1 is preferentially hypomethylated within adenomatous polyps in the presence of synchronous colorectal cancer
Published in
Clinical Epigenetics, March 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13148-017-0325-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alice Chu Jiang, Lela Buckingham, William Barbanera, Amoah Yeboah Korang, Faraz Bishesari, Joshua Melson

Abstract

Conventional tubular adenomas are frequently detected in patients undergoing average risk screening colonoscopy and are over-represented in patients who will develop colorectal cancer (CRC). Whether features of adenomas could serve as predictors of synchronous CRC is not known. Here, we investigate whether global methylation markers, including LINE-1, differ within adenomas in patients with and without synchronous CRC. Colorectal tubular/tubulovillous adenomatous polyps in the absence (P group, n = 45) and in the presence of synchronous CRC (PC group, n = 32) were identified. Global methylation and demethylation by ELISA for 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) and 5-hydroxymethyl cytosine (5-hmC), respectively, were assessed in polyps and adjacent normal non-neoplastic tissue. LINE-1 hypomethylation was assessed by pyrosequencing of bisulfite-converted DNA as well. Global methylation (5-mC) showed no differences in overall methylation status in the adenomatous polyps in the two groups (5-mC relative to control %, PC group 0.117; P group 0.161, p = 0.148). Global hydroxymethylation 5-hmC was also not significantly different in adenomatous polyps of the PC group than in those of the P group (0.0059 vs 0.0097, p = 0.681). Similarly, global 5-hmC was not different between normal tissues from patients without neoplasia in comparison to those from CRC patients (0.0461 ± 0.080 vs 0.039 ± 0.159, p = 0.215). In contrast, adenomatous polyps of the PC group had lower levels of LINE-1 methylation compared to the adenomas in the P group (53.07 ± 4.5 vs 59.95 ± 5.4, p < 0.001). LINE-1 methylation was also significantly lower in the normal tissue from cancer patients compared to that from patients without any neoplasia (58.07 ± 3.78 vs 71.50 ± 6.47, p < 0.001). LINE-1 hypomethylation of precancerous adenomas correlates with the presence of synchronous CRC. Measurement of DNA hypomethylation levels of colorectal adenomas by LINE-1 could have future implications in approaches to defining CRC risk in screening programs.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 17 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 24%
Student > Bachelor 3 18%
Researcher 2 12%
Student > Master 2 12%
Librarian 1 6%
Other 1 6%
Unknown 4 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 24%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 12%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 6%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 6%
Other 2 12%
Unknown 4 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 March 2017.
All research outputs
#7,955,096
of 9,176,636 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Epigenetics
#442
of 482 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#214,442
of 253,541 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Epigenetics
#24
of 26 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,176,636 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 482 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 26 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.