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Imiquimod has strain-dependent effects in mice and does not uniquely model human psoriasis

Overview of attention for article published in Genome Medicine, March 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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87 Dimensions

Readers on

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161 Mendeley
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Title
Imiquimod has strain-dependent effects in mice and does not uniquely model human psoriasis
Published in
Genome Medicine, March 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13073-017-0415-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

William R. Swindell, Kellie A. Michaels, Andrew J. Sutter, Doina Diaconu, Yi Fritz, Xianying Xing, Mrinal K. Sarkar, Yun Liang, Alex Tsoi, Johann E. Gudjonsson, Nicole L. Ward

Abstract

Imiquimod (IMQ) produces a cutaneous phenotype in mice frequently studied as an acute model of human psoriasis. Whether this phenotype depends on strain or sex has never been systematically investigated on a large scale. Such effects, however, could lead to conflicts among studies, while further impacting study outcomes and efforts to translate research findings. RNA-seq was used to evaluate the psoriasiform phenotype elicited by 6 days of Aldara (5% IMQ) treatment in both sexes of seven mouse strains (C57BL/6 J (B6), BALB/cJ, CD1, DBA/1 J, FVB/NJ, 129X1/SvJ, and MOLF/EiJ). In most strains, IMQ altered gene expression in a manner consistent with human psoriasis, partly due to innate immune activation and decreased homeostatic gene expression. The response of MOLF males was aberrant, however, with decreased expression of differentiation-associated genes (elevated in other strains). Key aspects of the IMQ response differed between the two most commonly studied strains (BALB/c and B6). Compared with BALB/c, the B6 phenotype showed increased expression of genes associated with DNA replication, IL-17A stimulation, and activated CD8+ T cells, but decreased expression of genes associated with interferon signaling and CD4+ T cells. Although IMQ-induced expression shifts mirrored psoriasis, responses in BALB/c, 129/SvJ, DBA, and MOLF mice were more consistent with other human skin conditions (e.g., wounds or infections). IMQ responses in B6 mice were most consistent with human psoriasis and best replicated expression patterns specific to psoriasis lesions. These findings demonstrate strain-dependent aspects of IMQ dermatitis in mice. We have shown that IMQ does not uniquely model psoriasis but in fact triggers a core set of pathways active in diverse skin diseases. Nonetheless, our findings suggest that B6 mice provide a better background than other strains for modeling psoriasis disease mechanisms.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 161 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 161 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 35 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 32 20%
Student > Bachelor 19 12%
Student > Master 16 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 5%
Other 21 13%
Unknown 30 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 33 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 24 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 21 13%
Immunology and Microbiology 19 12%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 13 8%
Other 16 10%
Unknown 35 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 March 2017.
All research outputs
#4,543,918
of 15,260,332 outputs
Outputs from Genome Medicine
#793
of 1,044 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#93,265
of 260,644 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genome Medicine
#8
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,260,332 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,044 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.7. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 260,644 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.