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Medial temporal lobe epilepsy associated with hippocampal sclerosis is a distinctive syndrome

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neurology, March 2017
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Title
Medial temporal lobe epilepsy associated with hippocampal sclerosis is a distinctive syndrome
Published in
Journal of Neurology, March 2017
DOI 10.1007/s00415-017-8441-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Young Joo No, Chiara Zavanone, Franck Bielle, Vi-Huong Nguyen-Michel, Yves Samson, Claude Adam, Vincent Navarro, Sophie Dupont

Abstract

Epileptic syndromes are distinctive disorders with specific features, which when taken together, permit a specific diagnosis. There is actually a debate on that medial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis is an epileptic syndrome. To address this issue, we searched for discriminative semiological features between temporal lobe epilepsy patients with hippocampal sclerosis (TLE-HS patients or group 1), TLE patients with medial structural lesion other than hippocampal sclerosis or in MRI-negative cases with medial onset on further investigations (group 2) and lateral TLE patients (LTLE or group 3). We retrospectively collected data from medical and EEG-video records of 523 TLE patients, referred for surgery to the Pitié-Salpêtrière Epileptology Unit between 1991 and 2014. We identified 389 patients belonging to group 1, 61 patients belonging to group 2, and 73 patients belonging to group 3 and performed a comparative analysis of their clinical data and surgical outcomes. TLE-HS patients (group 1): (1) began epilepsy earlier (11 ± 9 vs. 20 ± 10 vs. 15 ± 9 years); (2) exhibited more frequently early febrile convulsions (FC) (59 vs 7 vs 5%); (3) presented more: ictal gestural automatisms (90 vs 54 vs 67%), dystonic posturing (47 vs 20 vs 23%), and secondary generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) (70 vs 44% vs 48%) as compared to both groups 2 and 3 patients (all p < 0.001). With respect to auras, abdominal visceral auras were more reported by TLE-HS than by LTLE patients (49 vs 16%). Three cardinal criteria correctly classified 94% of patients into TLE-HS group: history of FC, dystonic posturing, and secondary GTCS. Postoperative outcome was significantly better in TLE-HS group than in the two other groups (p = 0.03 and 0.003). Our study demonstrates that cardinal criteria are reliably helpful to distinguish patients with TLE-HS from those with other TLE and may allow considering TLE-HS as a distinctive syndrome.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 28%
Student > Bachelor 4 22%
Unspecified 3 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 11%
Researcher 1 6%
Other 3 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 6 33%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 22%
Unspecified 4 22%
Psychology 2 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 6%
Other 1 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 March 2017.
All research outputs
#7,966,902
of 9,189,847 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neurology
#1,657
of 1,991 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#214,975
of 254,199 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neurology
#39
of 48 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 1,991 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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