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Global warming and recurrent mass bleaching of corals

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, March 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Citations

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1371 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
2304 Mendeley
Title
Global warming and recurrent mass bleaching of corals
Published in
Nature, March 2017
DOI 10.1038/nature21707
Pubmed ID
Authors

Terry P. Hughes, James T. Kerry, Mariana Álvarez-Noriega, Jorge G. Álvarez-Romero, Kristen D. Anderson, Andrew H. Baird, Russell C. Babcock, Maria Beger, David R. Bellwood, Ray Berkelmans, Tom C. Bridge, Ian R. Butler, Maria Byrne, Neal E. Cantin, Steeve Comeau, Sean R. Connolly, Graeme S. Cumming, Steven J. Dalton, Guillermo Diaz-Pulido, C. Mark Eakin, Will F. Figueira, James P. Gilmour, Hugo B. Harrison, Scott F. Heron, Andrew S. Hoey, Jean-Paul A. Hobbs, Mia O. Hoogenboom, Emma V. Kennedy, Chao-yang Kuo, Janice M. Lough, Ryan J. Lowe, Gang Liu, Malcolm T. McCulloch, Hamish A. Malcolm, Michael J. McWilliam, John M. Pandolfi, Rachel J. Pears, Morgan S. Pratchett, Verena Schoepf, Tristan Simpson, William J. Skirving, Brigitte Sommer, Gergely Torda, David R. Wachenfeld, Bette L. Willis, Shaun K. Wilson

Abstract

During 2015-2016, record temperatures triggered a pan-tropical episode of coral bleaching, the third global-scale event since mass bleaching was first documented in the 1980s. Here we examine how and why the severity of recurrent major bleaching events has varied at multiple scales, using aerial and underwater surveys of Australian reefs combined with satellite-derived sea surface temperatures. The distinctive geographic footprints of recurrent bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef in 1998, 2002 and 2016 were determined by the spatial pattern of sea temperatures in each year. Water quality and fishing pressure had minimal effect on the unprecedented bleaching in 2016, suggesting that local protection of reefs affords little or no resistance to extreme heat. Similarly, past exposure to bleaching in 1998 and 2002 did not lessen the severity of bleaching in 2016. Consequently, immediate global action to curb future warming is essential to secure a future for coral reefs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 1,855 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 2,304 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 6 <1%
Australia 3 <1%
Germany 2 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
Italy 2 <1%
France 1 <1%
Indonesia 1 <1%
Hong Kong 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Other 4 <1%
Unknown 2281 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 493 21%
Student > Master 444 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 387 17%
Researcher 284 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 74 3%
Other 263 11%
Unknown 359 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 650 28%
Environmental Science 563 24%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 199 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 157 7%
Engineering 54 2%
Other 242 11%
Unknown 439 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3619. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 July 2021.
All research outputs
#813
of 18,368,557 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#104
of 81,732 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11
of 269,284 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#4
of 865 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,368,557 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 81,732 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 92.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,284 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 865 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.