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Prokaryotic Cytoskeletons

Overview of attention for book
Attention for Chapter 13: Archaeal Actin-Family Filament Systems
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3 tweeters

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Chapter title
Archaeal Actin-Family Filament Systems
Chapter number 13
Book title
Prokaryotic Cytoskeletons
Published in
Sub cellular biochemistry, May 2017
DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-53047-5_13
Pubmed ID
Book ISBNs
978-3-31-953045-1, 978-3-31-953047-5
Authors

Lindås, Ann-Christin, Valegård, Karin, Ettema, Thijs J. G., Ann-Christin Lindås, Karin Valegård, Thijs J. G. Ettema

Editors

Jan Löwe, Linda A. Amos

Abstract

Actin represents one of the most abundant and conserved eukaryotic proteins over time, and has an important role in many different cellular processes such as cell shape determination, motility, force generation, cytokinesis, amongst many others. Eukaryotic actin has been studied for decades and was for a long time considered a eukaryote-specific trait. However, in the early 2000s a bacterial actin homolog, MreB, was identified, characterized and found to have a cytoskeletal function and group within the superfamily of actin proteins. More recently, an actin cytoskeleton was also identified in archaea. The genome of the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Pyrobaculum calidifontis contains a five-gene cluster named Arcade encoding for an actin homolog, Crenactin, polymerizing into helical filaments spanning the whole length of the cell. Phylogenetic and structural studies place Crenactin closer to the eukaryotic actin than to the bacterial homologues. A significant difference, however, is that Crenactin can form single helical filaments in addition to filaments containing two intertwined proto filaments. The genome of the recently discovered Lokiarchaeota encodes several different actin homologues, termed Lokiactins, which are even more closely related to the eukaryotic actin than Crenactin. A primitive, dynamic actin-based cytoskeleton in archaea could have enabled the engulfment of the alphaproteobacterial progenitor of the mitochondria, a key-event in the evolution of eukaryotes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 41%
Researcher 2 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 9%
Student > Master 2 9%
Other 1 5%
Other 4 18%
Unknown 2 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 45%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 14%
Environmental Science 1 5%
Physics and Astronomy 1 5%
Other 2 9%
Unknown 1 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 May 2017.
All research outputs
#10,163,716
of 16,492,476 outputs
Outputs from Sub cellular biochemistry
#127
of 280 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#147,855
of 270,006 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Sub cellular biochemistry
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,492,476 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 280 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,006 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them