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A pilot and feasibility study to assess children’s consumption in quick-service restaurants using plate waste methodology

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, March 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (54th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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2 Dimensions

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17 Mendeley
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Title
A pilot and feasibility study to assess children’s consumption in quick-service restaurants using plate waste methodology
Published in
BMC Public Health, March 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12889-017-4171-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Juliana F. W. Cohen, Susan B. Roberts, Stephanie Anzman-Frasca, Madeleine M. G. Gamache, Vanessa M. Lynskey, Emilia Matthews, Megan P. Mueller, Shanti Sharma, Christina D. Economos

Abstract

Children regularly consume foods from quick-service restaurants (QSR), but little is known about the foods that children order, the calories and nutrients consumed, the accuracy of stated calorie information, or the ability to assess food orders and consumption in QSRs. This study evaluated the feasibility of plate waste collection in QSRs and examined children's orders and consumption of meals from the standard and children's menus. Additional aims were to examine if the meals ordered met healthier standards for children's menu items and determine the accuracy of the QSR-stated energy content of foods. Fifteen QSRs, two malls, and 116 eligible parents were approached to participate in the study in 2015. Among the families recruited, children's meal orders and consumption were analyzed using plate waste methodology, and a subsample of foods was analyzed using bomb calorimetry in 2015. Two individual QSRs and one mall food court with two QSRs agreed to participate, and n = 50 participants (parents with children between the ages of 5-10 years) were recruited. Children consumed on average 519 calories, 5.7 g saturated fat, 957 mg sodium, 3.7 g fiber, and 22.7 g sugar. Children ordered and consumed significantly fewer calories and less sodium and sugar with meals ordered exclusively from the children's menu compared with the standard menu. Overall there were no significant differences between the measured and stated energy contents of the QSR foods. Conducting plate waste research in QSRs is feasible and there is concordance with stated calorie information. Consuming foods exclusively from the children's menu may help limit overconsumption in QSRs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 17 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 41%
Professor 2 12%
Student > Master 2 12%
Researcher 2 12%
Unspecified 2 12%
Other 2 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 5 29%
Unspecified 4 24%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 6%
Physics and Astronomy 1 6%
Other 3 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 March 2017.
All research outputs
#4,081,978
of 9,207,038 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#4,379
of 7,449 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#111,365
of 255,084 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#96
of 146 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,207,038 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 54th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,449 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.8. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 255,084 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 146 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.