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Are Military and Medical Ethics Necessarily Incompatible? A Canadian Case Study

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics, January 2021
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#14 of 739)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
21 Mendeley
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Title
Are Military and Medical Ethics Necessarily Incompatible? A Canadian Case Study
Published in
Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics, January 2021
DOI 10.1177/1073110516684809
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christiane Rochon, Bryn Williams-Jones

Abstract

Military physicians are often perceived to be in a position of 'dual loyalty' because they have responsibilities towards their patients but also towards their employer, the military institution. Further, they have to ascribe to and are bound by two distinct codes of ethics (i.e., medical and military), each with its own set of values and duties, that could at first glance be considered to be very different or even incompatible. How, then, can military physicians reconcile these two codes of ethics and their distinct professional/institutional values, and assume their responsibilities towards both their patients and the military institution? To clarify this situation, and to show how such a reconciliation might be possible, we compared the history and content of two national professional codes of ethics: the Defence Ethics of the Canadian Armed Forces and the Code of Ethics of the Canadian Medical Association. Interestingly, even if the medical code is more focused on duties and responsibility while the military code is more focused on core values and is supported by a comprehensive ethical training program, they also have many elements in common. Further, both are based on the same core values of loyalty and integrity, and they are broad in scope but are relatively flexible in application. While there are still important sources of tension between and limits within these two codes of ethics, there are fewer differences than may appear at first glance because the core values and principles of military and medical ethics are not so different.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 21 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 24%
Student > Bachelor 3 14%
Professor 3 14%
Student > Postgraduate 3 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 10%
Other 4 19%
Unknown 1 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 24%
Social Sciences 5 24%
Philosophy 3 14%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 10%
Decision Sciences 1 5%
Other 3 14%
Unknown 2 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 40. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 March 2017.
All research outputs
#372,728
of 12,550,439 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics
#14
of 739 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,877
of 252,610 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics
#1
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,550,439 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 739 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 252,610 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.