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Regional vegetation die-off in response to global-change-type drought

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, October 2005
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
6 news outlets
blogs
5 blogs
policy
3 policy sources
twitter
10 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
1287 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
1139 Mendeley
citeulike
8 CiteULike
Title
Regional vegetation die-off in response to global-change-type drought
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, October 2005
DOI 10.1073/pnas.0505734102
Pubmed ID
Authors

D. D. Breshears, N. S. Cobb, P. M. Rich, K. P. Price, C. D. Allen, R. G. Balice, W. H. Romme, J. H. Kastens, M. L. Floyd, J. Belnap, J. J. Anderson, O. B. Myers, C. W. Meyer

Abstract

Future drought is projected to occur under warmer temperature conditions as climate change progresses, referred to here as global-change-type drought, yet quantitative assessments of the triggers and potential extent of drought-induced vegetation die-off remain pivotal uncertainties in assessing climate-change impacts. Of particular concern is regional-scale mortality of overstory trees, which rapidly alters ecosystem type, associated ecosystem properties, and land surface conditions for decades. Here, we quantify regional-scale vegetation die-off across southwestern North American woodlands in 2002-2003 in response to drought and associated bark beetle infestations. At an intensively studied site within the region, we quantified that after 15 months of depleted soil water content, >90% of the dominant, overstory tree species (Pinus edulis, a piñon) died. The die-off was reflected in changes in a remotely sensed index of vegetation greenness (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index), not only at the intensively studied site but also across the region, extending over 12,000 km2 or more; aerial and field surveys confirmed the general extent of the die-off. Notably, the recent drought was warmer than the previous subcontinental drought of the 1950s. The limited, available observations suggest that die-off from the recent drought was more extensive than that from the previous drought, extending into wetter sites within the tree species' distribution. Our results quantify a trigger leading to rapid, drought-induced die-off of overstory woody plants at subcontinental scale and highlight the potential for such die-off to be more severe and extensive for future global-change-type drought under warmer conditions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 1,139 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 58 5%
Canada 8 <1%
Australia 6 <1%
South Africa 5 <1%
China 4 <1%
France 4 <1%
Spain 4 <1%
Chile 3 <1%
Argentina 3 <1%
Other 20 2%
Unknown 1024 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 272 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 268 24%
Student > Master 181 16%
Student > Bachelor 78 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 74 6%
Other 197 17%
Unknown 69 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 399 35%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 366 32%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 157 14%
Engineering 30 3%
Social Sciences 24 2%
Other 47 4%
Unknown 116 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 96. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 October 2019.
All research outputs
#196,916
of 14,620,388 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#4,353
of 83,092 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#190,394
of 13,779,194 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#4,345
of 82,923 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,620,388 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 83,092 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 26.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 13,779,194 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 82,923 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.