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Widespread Increase of Tree Mortality Rates in the Western United States

Overview of attention for article published in Science, January 2009
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Citations

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1033 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
1116 Mendeley
citeulike
3 CiteULike
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Title
Widespread Increase of Tree Mortality Rates in the Western United States
Published in
Science, January 2009
DOI 10.1126/science.1165000
Pubmed ID
Authors

P. J. van Mantgem, N. L. Stephenson, J. C. Byrne, L. D. Daniels, J. F. Franklin, P. Z. Fule, M. E. Harmon, A. J. Larson, J. M. Smith, A. H. Taylor, T. T. Veblen

Abstract

Persistent changes in tree mortality rates can alter forest structure, composition, and ecosystem services such as carbon sequestration. Our analyses of longitudinal data from unmanaged old forests in the western United States showed that background (noncatastrophic) mortality rates have increased rapidly in recent decades, with doubling periods ranging from 17 to 29 years among regions. Increases were also pervasive across elevations, tree sizes, dominant genera, and past fire histories. Forest density and basal area declined slightly, which suggests that increasing mortality was not caused by endogenous increases in competition. Because mortality increased in small trees, the overall increase in mortality rates cannot be attributed solely to aging of large trees. Regional warming and consequent increases in water deficits are likely contributors to the increases in tree mortality rates.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 1,116 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 53 5%
Canada 12 1%
Spain 7 <1%
United Kingdom 7 <1%
Brazil 5 <1%
Japan 4 <1%
Australia 4 <1%
Germany 3 <1%
France 3 <1%
Other 13 1%
Unknown 1005 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 294 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 255 23%
Student > Master 184 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 57 5%
Student > Bachelor 55 5%
Other 203 18%
Unknown 68 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 408 37%
Environmental Science 393 35%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 137 12%
Engineering 21 2%
Social Sciences 19 2%
Other 39 3%
Unknown 99 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 127. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 June 2019.
All research outputs
#146,993
of 15,149,790 outputs
Outputs from Science
#5,380
of 65,861 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#141,856
of 14,250,225 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science
#5,375
of 65,762 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,149,790 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 65,861 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 49.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 14,250,225 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 65,762 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.