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Human-Induced Changes in the Hydrology of the Western United States

Overview of attention for article published in Science, February 2008
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
4 blogs
policy
4 policy sources
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
638 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
496 Mendeley
citeulike
4 CiteULike
connotea
1 Connotea
Title
Human-Induced Changes in the Hydrology of the Western United States
Published in
Science, February 2008
DOI 10.1126/science.1152538
Pubmed ID
Authors

T. P. Barnett, D. W. Pierce, H. G. Hidalgo, C. Bonfils, B. D. Santer, T. Das, G. Bala, A. W. Wood, T. Nozawa, A. A. Mirin, D. R. Cayan, M. D. Dettinger

Abstract

Observations have shown that the hydrological cycle of the western United States changed significantly over the last half of the 20th century. We present a regional, multivariable climate change detection and attribution study, using a high-resolution hydrologic model forced by global climate models, focusing on the changes that have already affected this primarily arid region with a large and growing population. The results show that up to 60% of the climate-related trends of river flow, winter air temperature, and snow pack between 1950 and 1999 are human-induced. These results are robust to perturbation of study variates and methods. They portend, in conjunction with previous work, a coming crisis in water supply for the western United States.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 496 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 45 9%
Canada 5 1%
Germany 4 <1%
United Kingdom 4 <1%
South Africa 4 <1%
Switzerland 4 <1%
Mexico 2 <1%
China 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Other 6 1%
Unknown 420 85%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 132 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 123 25%
Student > Master 63 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 34 7%
Student > Bachelor 29 6%
Other 115 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 150 30%
Environmental Science 136 27%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 75 15%
Unspecified 49 10%
Engineering 44 9%
Other 42 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 53. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 November 2018.
All research outputs
#271,896
of 12,359,563 outputs
Outputs from Science
#7,820
of 55,455 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#265,615
of 11,757,866 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science
#7,813
of 54,893 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,359,563 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 55,455 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 38.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 11,757,866 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 54,893 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.