↓ Skip to main content

Accurate identification of the six human Plasmodium spp. causing imported malaria, including Plasmodium ovale wallikeri and Plasmodium knowlesi

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, September 2013
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
42 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
122 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Accurate identification of the six human Plasmodium spp. causing imported malaria, including Plasmodium ovale wallikeri and Plasmodium knowlesi
Published in
Malaria Journal, September 2013
DOI 10.1186/1475-2875-12-321
Pubmed ID
Authors

Adriana Calderaro, Giovanna Piccolo, Chiara Gorrini, Sabina Rossi, Sara Montecchini, Maria Loretana Dell’Anna, Flora De Conto, Maria Cristina Medici, Carlo Chezzi, Maria Cristina Arcangeletti

Abstract

Accurate identification of Plasmodium infections in non-endemic countries is of critical importance with regard to the administration of a targeted therapy having a positive impact on patient health and management and allowing the prevention of the risk of re-introduction of endemic malaria in such countries. Malaria is no longer endemic in Italy where it is the most commonly imported disease, with one of the highest rates of imported malaria among European non-endemic countries including France, the UK and Germany, and with a prevalence of 24.3% at the University Hospital of Parma. Molecular methods showed high sensitivity and specificity and changed the epidemiology of imported malaria in several non-endemic countries, highlighted a higher prevalence of Plasmodium ovale, Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium malariae underestimated by microscopy and, not least, brought to light both the existence of two species of P. ovale (Plasmodium ovale curtisi and Plasmodium ovale wallikeri) and the infection in humans by Plasmodium knowlesi, otherwise not detectable by microscopy.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 122 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Malaysia 1 <1%
Madagascar 1 <1%
Unknown 120 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 25 20%
Researcher 21 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 16%
Student > Bachelor 16 13%
Student > Postgraduate 7 6%
Other 15 12%
Unknown 19 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 32 26%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 26 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 18 15%
Chemistry 6 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 4%
Other 11 9%
Unknown 24 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 September 2013.
All research outputs
#2,744,854
of 3,616,025 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#1,019
of 1,318 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#62,209
of 82,364 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#40
of 54 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 3,616,025 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,318 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 82,364 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 54 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.