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Comparative Serological Assays for the Study of H5 and H7 Avian Influenza Viruses

Overview of attention for article published in Influenza Research & Treatment, September 2013
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Title
Comparative Serological Assays for the Study of H5 and H7 Avian Influenza Viruses
Published in
Influenza Research & Treatment, September 2013
DOI 10.1155/2013/286158
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eleonora Molesti, Adelaide Milani, Calogero Terregino, Giovanni Cattoli, Nigel J. Temperton

Abstract

The nature of influenza virus to randomly mutate and evolve into new types is an important challenge in the control of influenza infection. It is necessary to monitor virus evolution for a better understanding of the pandemic risk posed by certain variants as evidenced by the highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses. This has been clearly recognized in Egypt following the notification of the first HPAI H5N1 outbreak. The continuous circulation of the virus and the mass vaccination programme undertaken in poultry have resulted in a progressive genetic evolution and a significant antigenic drift near the major antigenic sites. In order to establish if vaccination is sufficient to provide significant intra- and interclade cross-protection, lentiviral pseudotypes derived from H5N1 HPAI viruses (A/Vietnam/1194/04, A/chicken/Egypt-1709-01/2007) and an antigenic drift variant (A/chicken/Egypt-1709-06-2008) were constructed and used in pseudotype-based neutralization assays (pp-NT). pp-NT data obtained was confirmed and correlated with HI and MN assays. A panel of pseudotypes belonging to influenza Groups 1 and 2, with a combination of reporter systems, was also employed for testing avian sera in order to support further application of pp-NT as an alternative valid assay that can improve avian vaccination efficacy testing, vaccine virus selection, and the reliability of reference sera.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 3 10%
Unknown 28 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 19%
Student > Master 5 16%
Researcher 5 16%
Student > Bachelor 4 13%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 3 10%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 5 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 32%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 13%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 10%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 3 10%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 4 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 March 2015.
All research outputs
#11,198,795
of 14,123,037 outputs
Outputs from Influenza Research & Treatment
#22
of 26 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#91,130
of 132,137 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Influenza Research & Treatment
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,123,037 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 26 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.6. This one scored the same or higher as 4 of them.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 132,137 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them