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Individual personalities predict social behaviour in wild networks of great tits (Parus major)

Overview of attention for article published in Ecology Letters, January 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#27 of 1,756)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)

Readers on

mendeley
362 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
Title
Individual personalities predict social behaviour in wild networks of great tits (Parus major)
Published in
Ecology Letters, January 2013
DOI 10.1111/ele.12181
Pubmed ID
Authors

Aplin, L. M., Farine, D. R., Morand‐Ferron, J., Cole, E. F., Cockburn, A., Sheldon, B. C., Aplin LM, Farine DR, Morand-Ferron J, Cole EF, Cockburn A, Sheldon BC, L. M. Aplin, D. R. Farine, J. Morand-Ferron, E. F. Cole, A. Cockburn, B. C. Sheldon, Andrew Sih

Abstract

Social environments have an important effect on a range of ecological processes, and form a crucial component of selection. However, little is known of the link between personality, social behaviour and population structure. We combine a well-understood personality trait with large-scale social networks in wild songbirds, and show that personality underpins multiple aspects of social organisation. First, we demonstrate a relationship between network centrality and personality with 'proactive' (fast-exploring) individuals associating weakly with greater numbers of conspecifics and moving between flocks. Second, temporal stability of associations relates to personality: 'reactive' (slow-exploring) birds form synergistically stable relationships. Finally, we show that personality influences social structure, with males non-randomly distributed across groups. These results provide strong evidence that songbirds follow alternative social strategies related to personality. This has implications not only for the causes of social network structure but also for the strength and direction of selection on personality in natural populations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 49 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 362 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 12 3%
United Kingdom 7 2%
South Africa 3 <1%
Sweden 3 <1%
Germany 2 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
Netherlands 2 <1%
Czech Republic 2 <1%
Switzerland 2 <1%
Other 6 2%
Unknown 321 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 113 31%
Student > Master 68 19%
Researcher 67 19%
Student > Bachelor 50 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 20 6%
Other 44 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 281 78%
Environmental Science 27 7%
Unspecified 21 6%
Psychology 15 4%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 5 1%
Other 13 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 137. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 December 2017.
All research outputs
#66,161
of 8,892,097 outputs
Outputs from Ecology Letters
#27
of 1,756 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,054
of 138,861 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecology Letters
#1
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,892,097 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,756 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 138,861 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them