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Late Danubian mitochondrial genomes shed light into the Neolithisation of Central Europe in the 5th millennium BC

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, March 2017
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (68th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
13 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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28 Mendeley
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Title
Late Danubian mitochondrial genomes shed light into the Neolithisation of Central Europe in the 5th millennium BC
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, March 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12862-017-0924-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maciej Chyleński, Anna Juras, Edvard Ehler, Helena Malmström, Janusz Piontek, Mattias Jakobsson, Arkadiusz Marciniak, Miroslawa Dabert

Abstract

Recent aDNA studies are progressively focusing on various Neolithic and Hunter - Gatherer (HG) populations, providing arguments in favor of major migrations accompanying European Neolithisation. The major focus was so far on the Linear Pottery Culture (LBK), which introduced the Neolithic way of life in Central Europe in the second half of 6th millennium BC. It is widely agreed that people of this culture were genetically different from local HGs and no genetic exchange is seen between the two groups. From the other hand some degree of resurgence of HGs genetic component is seen in late Neolithic groups belonging to the complex of the Funnel Beaker Cultures (TRB). Less attention is brought to various middle Neolithic cultures belonging to Late Danubian sequence which chronologically fall in between those two abovementioned groups. We suspected that genetic influx from HG to farming communities might have happened in Late Danubian cultures since archaeologists see extensive contacts between those two communities. Here we address this issue by presenting 5 complete mitochondrial genomes of various late Danubian individuals from modern-day Poland and combining it with available published data. Our data show that Late Danubian cultures are maternally closely related to Funnel Beaker groups instead of culturally similar LBK. We assume that it is an effect of the presence of individuals belonging to U5 haplogroup both in Late Danubians and the TRB. The U5 haplogroup is thought to be a typical for HGs of Europe and therefore we argue that it is an additional evidence of genetic exchange between farming and HG groups taking place at least as far back as in middle Neolithic, in the Late Danubian communities.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 28 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 21%
Student > Master 6 21%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 2 7%
Unspecified 2 7%
Other 3 11%
Unknown 1 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 46%
Arts and Humanities 5 18%
Unspecified 4 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 14%
Environmental Science 1 4%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 1 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 October 2017.
All research outputs
#871,759
of 12,022,940 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#320
of 2,267 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#36,737
of 286,326 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#19
of 61 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,022,940 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,267 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 286,326 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 61 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.