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Association of neighbourhood residence and preferences with the built environment, work-related travel behaviours, and health implications for employed adults: Findings from the URBAN study

Overview of attention for article published in Social Science & Medicine, October 2012
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1 tweeter

Citations

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23 Dimensions

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124 Mendeley
Title
Association of neighbourhood residence and preferences with the built environment, work-related travel behaviours, and health implications for employed adults: Findings from the URBAN study
Published in
Social Science & Medicine, October 2012
DOI 10.1016/j.socscimed.2012.05.029
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hannah M. Badland, Melody Oliver, Robin A. Kearns, Suzanne Mavoa, Karen Witten, Mitch J. Duncan, G. David Batty

Abstract

Although the neighbourhoods and health field is well established, the relationships between neighbourhood selection, neighbourhood preference, work-related travel behaviours, and transport infrastructure have not been fully explored. It is likely that understanding these complex relationships more fully will inform urban policy development, and planning for neighbourhoods that support health behaviours. Accordingly, the objective of this study was to identify associations between these variables in a sample of employed adults. Self-reported demographic, work-related transport behaviours, and neighbourhood preference data were collected from 1616 employed adults recruited from 48 neighbourhoods located across four New Zealand cities. Data were collected between April 2008 and September 2010. Neighbourhood built environment measures were generated using geographical information systems. Findings demonstrated that more people preferred to live in urban (more walkable), rather than suburban (less walkable) settings. Those living in more suburban neighbourhoods had significantly longer work commute distances and lower density of public transport stops available within the neighbourhood when compared with those who lived in more urban neighbourhoods. Those preferring a suburban style neighbourhood commuted approximately 1.5 km further to work when compared with participants preferring urban settings. Respondents who preferred a suburban style neighbourhood were less likely to take public or active transport to/from work when compared with those who preferred an urban style setting, regardless of the neighbourhood type in which they resided. Although it is unlikely that constructing more walkable environments will result in work-related travel behaviour change for all, providing additional highly walkable environments will help satisfy the demand for these settings, reinforce positive health behaviours, and support those amenable to change to engage in higher levels of work-related public and active transport.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 124 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Colombia 1 <1%
Malaysia 1 <1%
Indonesia 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 119 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 25 20%
Student > Master 24 19%
Researcher 18 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 7%
Student > Bachelor 7 6%
Other 27 22%
Unknown 14 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 29 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 21 17%
Environmental Science 12 10%
Engineering 7 6%
Sports and Recreations 5 4%
Other 24 19%
Unknown 26 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 August 2012.
All research outputs
#7,653,085
of 12,246,070 outputs
Outputs from Social Science & Medicine
#6,266
of 7,257 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#81,885
of 158,694 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Social Science & Medicine
#84
of 117 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,246,070 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,257 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.0. This one is in the 8th percentile – i.e., 8% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 158,694 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 117 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.