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Vitamin D: a possible modifying factor linking obesity to vascular calcification in hemodialysis patients

Overview of attention for article published in Nutrition & Metabolism, March 2017
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1 tweeter
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1 Facebook page

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5 Dimensions

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14 Mendeley
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Title
Vitamin D: a possible modifying factor linking obesity to vascular calcification in hemodialysis patients
Published in
Nutrition & Metabolism, March 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12986-017-0181-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jwa-Kyung Kim, Mi Jin Park, Young Rim Song, Hyung Jik Kim, Sung Gyun Kim

Abstract

Obesity is a risk factor for increased cardiovascular disease. Whether vitamin D deficiency modifies this association is unclear. Here, we examined the association of obesity and vitamin D deficiency with vascular calcification score (VCS) in incident end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 213 ESRD patients. Vitamin D deficiency was defined as serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels below 10 ng/mL, and obesity was defined as a percentage of body fat (PBF) higher than the sex-specific median value in the cohort (>26.8% for men, >36.2% for women). VCS was measured by plain radiographic film of the lateral abdomen in the standing position. Most ESRD patients (76.6%) had 25(OH)D deficiency at the start of dialysis. The prevalence of 25(OH)D deficiency was much higher in obese patients than non-obese patients, and it had significant inverse association with PBF (r = -0.315, p < 0.001). Abdominal aortic calcification was identified in 104 (48.9%) patients. VCS was significantly higher in obese population; 2.6 (0-23) for all patients, 4.2 (0-23) for obese and 1.0 (0-12) for non-obese patients (p < 0.001). Interestingly, vitamin D deficiency was associated with greater risk of a high VCS, especially in obese population [odds ratio (OR) 3.02, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.09-9.38)], but not with non-obese patients (OR 1.82, 95% CI 0.56-5.60). The magnitude and direction of the association between obesity and the risk of vascular calcification may depend on an individual's 25(OH)D level, a possible representative marker of cardiometabolic disturbance in ESRD patients.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Indonesia 1 7%
Unknown 13 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 29%
Professor 2 14%
Student > Master 2 14%
Librarian 1 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Unknown 3 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 50%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 7%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 7%
Unknown 5 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 July 2017.
All research outputs
#6,842,229
of 11,437,561 outputs
Outputs from Nutrition & Metabolism
#426
of 595 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#149,670
of 283,784 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nutrition & Metabolism
#10
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,437,561 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 595 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.7. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 283,784 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.