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Extensive relationship between antisense transcription and alternative splicing in the human genome

Overview of attention for article published in Genome Research, June 2011
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
8 tweeters

Citations

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49 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
164 Mendeley
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7 CiteULike
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Title
Extensive relationship between antisense transcription and alternative splicing in the human genome
Published in
Genome Research, June 2011
DOI 10.1101/gr.113431.110
Pubmed ID
Authors

A. S. Morrissy, M. Griffith, M. A. Marra

Abstract

To analyze the relationship between antisense transcription and alternative splicing, we developed a computational approach for the detection of antisense-correlated exon splicing events using Affymetrix exon array data. Our analysis of expression data from 176 lymphoblastoid cell lines revealed that the majority of expressed sense-antisense genes exhibited alternative splicing events that were correlated to the expression of the antisense gene. Most of these events occurred in areas of sense-antisense (SAS) gene overlap, which were significantly enriched in both exons and nucleosome occupancy levels relative to nonoverlapping regions of the same genes. Nucleosome occupancy was highly correlated with Pol II abundance across overlapping regions and with concomitant increases in local alternative exon usage. These results are consistent with an antisense transcription-mediated mechanism of splicing regulation in normal human cells. A comparison of the prevalence of antisense-correlated splicing events between individuals of Mormon versus African descent revealed population-specific events that may indicate the continued evolution of new SAS loci. Furthermore, the presence of antisense transcription was correlated to alternative splicing across multiple metazoan species, suggesting that it may be a conserved mechanism contributing to splicing regulation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 164 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 11 7%
United Kingdom 4 2%
Germany 3 2%
Denmark 2 1%
Canada 2 1%
Norway 2 1%
Italy 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
China 1 <1%
Other 5 3%
Unknown 132 80%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 56 34%
Researcher 50 30%
Student > Master 12 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 11 7%
Student > Bachelor 9 5%
Other 25 15%
Unknown 1 <1%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 115 70%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 28 17%
Unspecified 5 3%
Computer Science 5 3%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 3%
Other 5 3%
Unknown 1 <1%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 August 2011.
All research outputs
#2,364,455
of 11,321,427 outputs
Outputs from Genome Research
#1,695
of 3,229 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,290,637
of 10,657,549 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genome Research
#1,679
of 3,157 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,321,427 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 79th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,229 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.3. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 10,657,549 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,157 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.