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Evidence for coseismic subsidence events in a southern California coastal saltmarsh

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, March 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
26 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
40 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
14 Mendeley
Title
Evidence for coseismic subsidence events in a southern California coastal saltmarsh
Published in
Scientific Reports, March 2017
DOI 10.1038/srep44615
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robert Leeper, Brady Rhodes, Matthew Kirby, Katherine Scharer, Joseph Carlin, Eileen Hemphill-Haley, Simona Avnaim-Katav, Glen MacDonald, Scott Starratt, Angela Aranda

Abstract

Paleoenvironmental records from a southern California coastal saltmarsh reveal evidence for repeated late Holocene coseismic subsidence events. Field analysis of sediment gouge cores established discrete lithostratigraphic units extend across the wetland. Detailed sediment analyses reveal abrupt changes in lithology, percent total organic matter, grain size, and magnetic susceptibility. Microfossil analyses indicate that predominantly freshwater deposits bury relic intertidal deposits at three distinct depths. Radiocarbon dating indicates that the three burial events occurred in the last 2000 calendar years. Two of the three events are contemporaneous with large-magnitude paleoearthquakes along the Newport-Inglewood/Rose Canyon fault system. From these data, we infer that during large magnitude earthquakes a step-over along the fault zone results in the vertical displacement of an approximately 5-km(2) area that is consistent with the footprint of an estuary identified in pre-development maps. These findings provide insight on the evolution of the saltmarsh, coseismic deformation and earthquake recurrence in a wide area of southern California, and sensitive habitat already threatened by eustatic sea level rise.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 40 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Estonia 1 7%
Japan 1 7%
Unknown 12 86%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 3 21%
Researcher 3 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 21%
Student > Postgraduate 1 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 7%
Other 3 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 7 50%
Environmental Science 3 21%
Unspecified 3 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 251. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 April 2018.
All research outputs
#44,779
of 12,781,938 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#587
of 59,980 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,406
of 257,933 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#1
of 27 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,781,938 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 59,980 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 257,933 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 27 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.