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Decreased cortical FADD protein is associated with clinical dementia and cognitive decline in an elderly community sample

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Neurodegeneration, March 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#28 of 451)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 news outlets
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

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24 Mendeley
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Title
Decreased cortical FADD protein is associated with clinical dementia and cognitive decline in an elderly community sample
Published in
Molecular Neurodegeneration, March 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13024-017-0168-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alfredo Ramos-Miguel, Jesús A. García-Sevilla, Alasdair M. Barr, Thomas A. Bayer, Peter Falkai, Sue E. Leurgans, Julie A. Schneider, David A. Bennett, William G. Honer, M. Julia García-Fuster

Abstract

FADD (Fas-associated death domain) adaptor is a crucial protein involved in the induction of cell death but also mediates non-apoptotic actions via a phosphorylated form (p-Ser194-FADD). This study investigated the possible association of FADD forms with age-related neuropathologies, cognitive function, and the odds of dementia in an elderly community sample. FADD forms were quantified by western blot analysis in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) samples from a large cohort of participants in a community-based aging study (Memory and Aging Project, MAP), experiencing no-(NCI, n = 51) or mild-(MCI, n = 42) cognitive impairment, or dementia (n = 57). Cortical FADD was lower in subjects with dementia and lower FADD was associated with a greater load of amyloid-β pathology, fewer presynaptic terminal markers, poorer cognitive function and increased odds of dementia. Together with the observations of FADD redistribution into tangles and dystrophic neurites within plaques in Alzheimer's disease brains, and its reduction in APP23 mouse cortex, the results suggest this multifunctional protein might participate in the mechanisms linking amyloid and tau pathologies during the course of the illness. The present data suggests FADD as a putative biomarker for pathological processes associated with the course of clinical dementia.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 21%
Student > Master 5 21%
Student > Bachelor 3 13%
Other 2 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 8%
Other 4 17%
Unknown 3 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 17%
Neuroscience 4 17%
Psychology 2 8%
Decision Sciences 1 4%
Other 4 17%
Unknown 5 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 April 2017.
All research outputs
#631,964
of 9,278,926 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Neurodegeneration
#28
of 451 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29,852
of 260,468 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Neurodegeneration
#2
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,278,926 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 451 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 260,468 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.