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Methodological considerations for detection of terrestrial small-body salamander eDNA and implications for biodiversity conservation

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Ecology Resources, April 2017
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Title
Methodological considerations for detection of terrestrial small-body salamander eDNA and implications for biodiversity conservation
Published in
Molecular Ecology Resources, April 2017
DOI 10.1111/1755-0998.12667
Pubmed ID
Authors

Donald M. Walker, Jacob E. Leys, Kelly E. Dunham, Joshua C. Oliver, Emily E. Schiller, Kelsey S. Stephenson, John T. Kimrey, Jessica Wooten, Mark W. Rogers

Abstract

Environmental DNA (eDNA) can be used as an assessment tool to detect populations of threatened species and provide fine-scale data required to make management decisions. The objectives of this project were to use quantitative PCR (qPCR) to: 1) detect spiked salamander DNA in soil, 2) quantify eDNA degradation over time, 3) determine detectability of salamander eDNA in a terrestrial environment using soil, feces, and skin swabs, 4) detect salamander eDNA in a mesocosm experiment. Salamander eDNA was positively detected in 100% of skin swabs and 66% of fecal samples and concentrations did not differ between the two sources. However, eDNA was not detected in soil samples collected from directly underneath wild-caught living salamanders. Salamander genomic DNA (gDNA) was detected in all qPCR reactions when spiked into soil at 10.0, 5.0, and 1.0 ng/g soil and spike concentration had a significant effect on detected concentrations. Only 33% of samples showed recoverable eDNA when spiked with 0.25 ng/g soil, which was the low end of eDNA detection. To determine the rate of eDNA degradation, gDNA (1 ng/g soil) was spiked into soil and quantified over seven days. Salamander eDNA concentrations decreased across days, but eDNA was still amplifiable at day 7. Salamander eDNA was detected in two of 182 mesocosm soil samples over 12 weeks (n=52 control samples; n=65 presence samples; n=65 eviction samples). The discrepancy in detection success between experiments indicates the potential challenges for this method to be used as a monitoring technique for small-bodied wild terrestrial salamander populations. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 93 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 93 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 24%
Student > Master 18 19%
Researcher 15 16%
Student > Bachelor 12 13%
Professor 2 2%
Other 4 4%
Unknown 20 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 34 37%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 20 22%
Environmental Science 15 16%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 1%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 1%
Other 1 1%
Unknown 21 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 June 2018.
All research outputs
#10,060,937
of 13,160,482 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Ecology Resources
#798
of 936 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#176,457
of 262,257 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Ecology Resources
#38
of 41 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,160,482 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 936 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.0. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,257 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 41 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 4th percentile – i.e., 4% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.